In this sentence, which pronoun should I use? 'one younger sister and I' or 'one younger sister and me' to be strictly grammatical?

There are seven members in my family. They are my father, my mother, two elder brothers, one elder sister, one younger sister and I(or)me.

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I do think the second sentence is grammatically correct but it doesn’t sound very natural. Why not simply list the family members following the first sentence?

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They are my father, my mother, two elder brothers, one elder sister, one younger sister and I(or)me.".

I would use “me”.

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Both are possible. ‘Me’ is certainly more popular while ‘I’ is considered more formal.

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Hi Thura_Hun, I suggest you merge your sentences as follows:

There are seven members in my family: my father, my mother, two elder brothers, an elder and a younger sister and I(or)me.

I agree with Torsten that me is less formal than I.

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Thura_Htun

To be strictly grammatical, it should be the first as in: One younger sister and I accompanied my (our) uncle. (If you want to begin a sentence with that phrase).

But if the phrase comes as an object, the second would be grammatical: My uncle took one (my) younger sister and me to the shopping mall.

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I agree with both, Sir Kohyoongliat and Sir Anglophile. “I” is a subject pronoun needs a verb but “me” is an object pronoun needs no verb.

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Hi both of you,

I merely stated that ‘me’ was less formal than ‘I’ and I don’t see any problem with that.

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By the way, I wish I had a sibling, only one, not four. I think that would be too much for me to handle, given the fact that I am a member of what one calls a functional, dysfunctional family. :smiley:

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Oh and Mona_Rmzi

Do me favour and stop addressing male members with ‘Sir’. If you were to call me that way, I think I would become as venomous as that cat avatar of yours. :rage:

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You may please avoid prefixing or suffixing ‘Sir’ to Anglophile which is my pseudonym.

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Excuse me, what is the difference if it is your true or pseudonym? “Sir” is only for respect. What is the problem, exactly?
Many thanks

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Hahahaha… Hello, If you do not mind, could you please told me why? About my avatar, the nice balck cat is not venomous, it is only angry. Hahahaha…

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Hi Mona_Rmzi,

Actually, there’s nothing wrong with you being respectful, however, considering the fact that we are all a bit familiar with each other on the forum, you are allowed to be a little less formal. In shops some shop assistants will address you with ‘Sir, Madam’, however if they know your first name they will address you as follows, for example: ‘Hello, Marc.’ Both you and they will get to know each other’s first names after a while and so grow accustomed to it.
Yet, I would recommend ‘Sir’ and ‘Madam’ in the salutation of letters of application, because you don’t know your possibly future employer. So, you want to write : ‘Dear Sir(s), Dear Madam(s)’

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Dear Mona,

I was only a bit irritable that day.

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No problem, It is OK.

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I’m happy you had a great laugh. I know cats aren’t venomous, but your avatar shows clearly that yours is angry indeed.

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Only that, cats are very nice when they are angry, especially domestic ones.

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Does this mean you find it cute after you have teased it a little too much? By the way is it male or female, your cat, I mean, not the avatar.

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Looks like your device fell into a homophone trap :slight_smile:

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