You need (to) say nothing about it

You ______ nothing about it.
(A) need say
(B) don’t need to say
(C) need to say
(D) need not to say
Source: Ting-Chi Tang in English Question Box: An Introduction to Linguistic Analysis of English , p246.

The answer is option A. Is option C also acceptable?

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A and C have the same meaning. So, yes C is acceptable.

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I think (C) is the best answer.
(A) is awkward in my opinion.

You don’t need to say anything about it.” is much better than any of the choices provided.

Or as an imperative:

Don’t say anything about it.

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I agree, because according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, ‘You need not say so’ dates back to 1921. Therefore it’s use is a bit old-fashioned. Mind you, I don’t think being old-fashioned is wrong. However, I do prefer ‘You don’t need to say anything about it.’

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Another old fashioned one I’ve heard is “have needs to”.

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I’ve never heard of it. But now I know what it means. Thank you, NN.

We know that the verb need can be used as an auxiliary (modal) and as a main verb.
When used as an auxiliary, we do not use the particle to.
So, the question can have two answers depending on how you want to treat the verb.
If treated as an auxiliary, Option A will be correct. If as a main verb, Option C will be correct.
American English uses the verb (need) mostly as a DO-verb, so we find Option C as the most common answer.
In English, need say and need not say are modal expressions whereas need to say and do/does not need to say are verbal expressions in the present tense.

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How nice to read/hear you again, Lawrence.

According to modern grammar C, but A is in my experience the normal way to say it. The phrase is a bit of an idiom.

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Thank you, Marc.

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You’re welcome. I’ve missed you.