...we moved houses


#1

We were former neighbours who lost touch with each other after we moved houses.

Is ‘moved houses’ correct to mean that we each moved house to live in a different place? That’s why we lost contact with each other.

Thanks.


#2

The “for” is optional. To me it sounds equally natural either way - “requested for her to sing”, “requested her to sing”, “requested that she sing”.


#3

Because of her beautiful singing voice, many customers requested for her to sing.

Instead of many customers, we can say audience or fans. (it is only option).


#4

There is a difference here - ‘They requested for her to sing’ suggests they wanted her and nobody else to sing. ‘They requested her to sing’ simply means they asked her to sing.


#5

What a nuance! Thanks, Alan.
Anyhow, usually, when request is used as a verb, for is avoided.


#6

Actually, I would say depending on the context, this nuance could result in quite a difference :blush:


#7

Just looked at the text again and want to comment on ‘we moved houses’.This could be misunderstood as it should be - We moved house. The plural might suggest that you physically moved them. It reminds me of a related misunderstanding with one of my students years ago, who was taking ‘O’ level English in a class for foreign students. The class had to write an essay with the title ‘Moving house’ and one student wrote me a long essay describing what he considered to be big houses that moved such as aeroplanes, cruise liners and so on.


#8

Thanks, Alan.

I realise I’ve posted under the subject “requested for”. I’m sorry for the blunder.