Use of "go waste"

Are the sentences below correct:

We have spent 2 days to create those software.
The effort should not go waste - we have to copy those files in a centralized location.

Thanks,
S

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We have spent two days on creating this software. In order to make sure we don’t lose our work we need to save a copy of the code in the cloud.

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Thanks Torsten, for re-writing the sentences and correcting it!

Seems, I did not explain properly.
My intention was, the software we have developed should be used from now on, in our office.
For this, the same sentence is suitable?

Thanks!

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In this case I suggest to ue the following:

We have spent two days on creating this software and to make sure our efforts don’t go to waste we have decided to use the software on-prem.

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You must put to before waste and it’ll be correct.

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You must have noticed that Torsten used TWO instead of 2.
Usually, numbers from one to nine are written in words.

And it is to go waste, not go to waste.

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Unfortunately, Anglophile, you would be mistaken. The sentence “The effort should not to go waste.” Isn’t grammatically correct or really makes any sense. “The effort should not go to waste.” Is the correct form of the sentence.

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I don’t know whether you can agree or not, the implied meaning of the usage is “go (as) waste”.

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I understand what you mean, but the sentence “The effort should not to go waste.” Just simply isn’t grammatically correct.

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It would be like me saying “I should to go school.” That’s not correct. It’d be " I should go to school."

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Your sentence has made me laugh, RyanBell!

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Thanks Torsten, for helping me out, and this is what I wanted to say!

Thanks!

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Thanks Anglophile, for your response!

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I’m glad to hear that. Keep those questions coming, they are very interesting!

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However, in Software, we rarely (at-least as far as I have heard) use the word on-prem.
We just say, “we have to use it from now on”.

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Actually, it’s the other way round. The term ‘on premises’ is almost exclusively used in connection with software and it’s the opposite to SaS (software as a service). Here are just a few references:


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Ok, got it now, thanks for sharing the information Torsten!

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