To please consider


#1

Hello everyone,
What is the meaning of “to please consider”. Are they 2 verbs and why 2 verbs can stand together?

We are asking people to please consider making a contribution to our mission, which is to support Democratic candidates at the local, state and national level and to advocate for issues that we care about.

Thank you.


#2

I don’t think we have two verbs in a row here—please is an adverb in the sentence. You can see it used as a polite addition to requests in sentences like this: “Will you please turn the radio off?”

Rephrased, the original could read: We are asking people, “Please consider making a contribution to our mission” (turning it into direct speech.)


#3

Perhaps -


#4

“Will you please turn the radio off?” -> please is an exclamation here, not a verb, I think so.


#5

Well, well. 1. “Traditional grammar classifies words based on eight parts of speech: the verb, the noun, the pronoun, the adjective, the adverb, the preposition, the conjunction, and the interjection.”
Exclamation is not a part of speech, it is “a sudden cry or remark expressing surprise, strong emotion, or pain.”
2. The word please in the original was used as an adverb.
“please
adverb
a word added to an order or request in order to be polite—Please open the window. Close the door, please. Will you please come with me?”
thefreedictionary.com/%20please
3. Good dictionary could probably help.


#6

please
exclamation UK ​ /pliːz/ US ​ /pliːz/

A1 used to make a request more polite:
Could I have two coffees and a tea, please?
Please remember to close the windows before you leave.

used to add force to a request or demand:
Please, David, put the knife down.
Oh, please. Do shut up!

uk used especially by children to a teacher or other adult in order to get their attention:
Please, Miss, I know the answer!


thefreedictionary.com/%20please


#7

Strangely, the link you‘re referring to–http://www.thefreedictionary.com/%20please—doesn’t have the examples you’ve provided.

–sounds quite obscure to me keeping in mind that

“exclamation–a sudden cry or remark expressing surprise, strong emotion, or pain.”
Making a request more polite by a sudden cry is something I’d like to see.

Staying with “Will you please turn the radio off?” which you’re trying to make an exclamatory sentence, I don’t see why on earth you should express any strong emotion there (please serves just as a polite addition to your request.)
To sound exclamatory, it should be rephrased like, ”Please, please, turn the radio off!”
Any new ideas?..


#8

There are many different explanations about “please.”

Here are just two to share with my fellow members/guests.


1.“Please do as you are told.”

a. “Please” … is now felt to be an auxiliary verb to be used in polite commands or requests."

– House and Harman, Descriptive English Grammar (1931 and 1950), pages 109 and 336.

  1. “Please (pause) go and order a cab!” or “Go and order a cab (pause), please!”

a. “Please” in those sentences is a subjunctive (may it please you) used as a sentence adverb.

– Curme, A Grammar of the English Language (1931), page 132.