Talking loudly can wake the child up

“Talking loudly you can wake the child up” - okay,
“Talking” is the participle because of the adverb “loudly”.
“you” is the subject that performs the action (wake up).

“Talking can wake the child up” - okay,
“Talking” is both the gerund/noun and the subject that performs the action.

"Talking loudly can wake the child up " - is the participle acting as the subject here?

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Yes, the gerund ‘talking loudly’ is the subject.

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Thank you for the reply.
So, "Talking loudly you can wake the child up”, “talking” is still participle there, right?
“Talking loudly can wake the child up” - do I understand correctly, we regard “talking loudly” as a whole?
Can we change the order? - "Loudly talking can wake the child up "

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Yes, ‘talking’ is a gerund here. As for chaning the order, this would work:

Loud talking can wake up the child but it doesn’t sound natural at all and you will never read or hear it.

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But the participle and the gerund aren’t exactly the same thing, are they?

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That’s right. A gerund can function as the subject of a sentence while a participle can’t.

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Yes, Talking loudly can wake the child up - is the title here and Talking is the subject of the sentence.

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Wake the child up - OK, and more common in conversational English
Wake up the child - Better, and more formal

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