Simile into metaphor: Her cheeks are red as blood

Hi

Can you please change the given simile into metaphor?

1- Her cheeks are red as blood. (simile)

If I write:

1- Her cheeks are blood. (how is that?)

I know about some situations where they can be changed.

1- He is a lion. (He is strong as a lion.)
2- They are rats. (They are as cowardly as rats.)
3- She is a rose. (She is beautiful like a rose.)

Thanks in advance

Tom

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Some metaphors are happier than others. I don’t much care for this one.
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Thank you, Mr Micawber.

To understand it simply, could I say that some similes can not be turned into metaphors?

Please reply

Tom

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Well, I am not sure that it is impossible, Tom, but I think that it takes a poet to do it decently. I cannot offhand see how to change your cheeks/blood one. Perhaps another member is more talented at this.
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Hi Tom,

Her cheeks are blood red? It reminds me of a famous ballad :

and the opening lines are:

As this is an old Scottish ballad, you have to realise that blood is written and pronounced as blude, where becomes whare and skilful becomes skeely A skipper is a captain of a ship

Alan

Thank you Mr. Micawber and Sir Alan (for constantly bearing with me :smiley: )

Last question: Can the given sentence be called a metaphor?

“Her cheeks are blood red.”

Tom

Dear Amy

What do you think about my question? Would you discuss the burden of the topic a bit? I would love to know your opinions about the same.

Tom

Hi Tom

I agree with Mr. Micawber’s statements about your original question.

Some things just don’t work well as metaphors. But I think it’s also possible that, given exactly the right context, you can probably say things that would otherwise (out of context) just sound weird.

“Her cheeks are blood red”[/i] isn’t a metaphor in my opinion, it’s simply a description of the color or her cheeks.

Amy

Hi Amy,

Surely the simile her cheeks are as red as blood becomes metaphorical when you say her cheeks are blood red? Or am I out of order?

Alan

Hi Alan

Let me ask you a question. What do you consider the difference between metaphor and metaphoric to be (other than the obvious noun/adjective difference)? And aren’t similes a little different from metaphors?

Tom’s question was whether Her cheeks are blood red is a metaphor or not. And I just couldn’t see the answer to that question as yes. Particularly in light of the other examples he gave.

But, then again, maybe I’m out of order. :lol:

Tom’s sentence could also have been reworded as Her cheeks are the same color as blood. In my book, that’s not a metaphor. Is that a simile? I guess so. 8)

Amy

As for me,I don’t see any metaphorical sense here.It may be considered rather a simile than a metaphor.By the way,it occurred to me that it would be better to create a columh dealing with stylistics and stylistic analysis :smiley: What’s your opinion?I think it would be very useful!

Hi,

Without wishing to flog a dead horse (now there’s a metaphor) to me a metaphor is a non-literal use of a word and that’s how I see this wrteched woman and her cheeks. It’s like the old king drinking his blude-red wine.

Alan

Hi Alan

Now there’s something I agree with. :smiley:

Also not wishing to flog a dead horse, but nonetheless not being able to resist, here’s something I found (from The Black Adder):
This is a crisis. A large crisis. In fact, if you’ve got a moment, it’s a twelve-story crisis with a magnificent entrance hall, carpeting throughout, 24-hour porterage and an enormous sign on the roof saying 'This Is a Large Crisis.’”

Now, is that a metaphor or a simile? :lol:

Amy

Hi Amy,

Now that’s a metaphor to die for! Just think of the learning opportunities the whole of Blackadder would provide. Now I have a plan. A cunning plan …

Alan

Hi Amy and Alan

So “I could not see the wood for trees.”

Tom