Shouldn't the full stop be inside the closing quotation marks in British English?


#1

"The main issue is politics. Once you don’t get (it) right, then the people suffer”, he said.

Shouldn’t the full stop be inside the closing quotation marks in British English?

Thanks.


#2

I think it’s important to remember that punctuation is a guide to the reader on the way sentences are constructed and so the way in which they are to be interpreted. Full stops, commas, question marks and so on all tell us for example that the sentence is finished, there is a pause or perhaps that it’s a question. Inverted commas (single or plural) indicate speech. It would seem sensible that these marks go right at the end of the sentence after the other speech marks so that we know that we are reading what is being said by a particular speaker. These inverted commas are like a frame around the actual speech.


#3

Thanks, Alan, for the detailed reply.