shortcut + to V or V-ing?

1/ Actually, there’s no shortcut to (master) a language
=> The answer of this item is “mastering”. I know the structure “A shortcut to something/ doing something”, but I wonder if it is ok if we use “a shortcut to master a language” here (to express purpose) Is it very awkward in native English?
2/ He completely agree … what I said
=> The answer for this is “with”. However, as far as I know, “agree with + sb” and “agree to + sth” (according to my monolingual dictionary) So is the dictionary wrong?

Hi,

‘A shortcut to mastering/to master’? I would suggest that the word ‘shortcut’ doesn’t sound right with an infinitive because it isn’t clear or rather doesn’t make sense because the ‘shortcut’ isn’t doing the ‘mastering’. The infinitive in this respect is too precise.

On the matter of ‘agree’, I think the definition of ‘with someone’ or ‘to something’ is too rigid. When you say: I agree with that proposal, you are in fact saying ‘I am in agreement with that proposal’ in the same way as you would also say: I agree with you. ‘Agree to’ has more the idea of acceptance and in a way giving permission for something to happen. You could say: The government agreed to the new regulations being accepted.

Alan

As for the matter of ‘‘A shortcut to mastering/to master’’, if you say the word ‘shortcut’ doesn’t sound right with an infinitive because it isn’t clear or rather doesn’t make sense because the ‘shortcut’ isn’t doing the ‘mastering’, then how about this:

Is there anything to eat?
There are many ways to get to the station

=> In these case, obviously “anything” doesn’t do the “eating”, and ‘ways’ doesn’t do the “getting to the station”, don’t they? but the sentences are still ok…

And as for the matter of “agree with” and “agree to”, you mean that both cases are acceptable?

1 Like

Any more idea, please?

Nessie, in addition to Alan’s explanation which makes perfect sense, you should view ‘no shortcut to’ as phrase that’s followed by a noun. The construction is similar to saying ‘there is no direct route to this place’. So ‘mastering a language’ is a noun rather than a verb.

It seems that the verb agree can be combined with quite a number of prepositions.

By the way, your question should read Any more ideas?[YSaerTTEW443543]

TOEIC short conversations: Scheduling an appointment.[YSaerTTEW443543]