rector vs chancellor vs president


#1

Hi,
I need your help, could you tell me, please, which word is the best to describe the head of the university:

rector, chancellor, president.

I have always thought that ‘chancellor’, but, on surfing the net found out ‘president & rector’ (we have this word in Ukrainian). So which one is the most common?

Thanks in advance


#2

Hi Baghiee,

It seems that like major business corprorations, different universities place different emphasis on different titles. I agree that for the major universities in Britain ‘Chancellor’ is the correct term, but I have also known universities use ‘president’ to describe the head.

This is from a guide to the University of Oxford:
The university’s formal head is the Chancellor (currently Lord Patten of Barnes), though as with most British universities, the Chancellor is a titular figure, rather than someone involved with the day-to-day running of the university. The Chancellor is elected by the members of Convocation, a body comprising all graduates of the university, and holds office until death.
The Vice-Chancellor, currently Andrew Hamilton, is the “de facto” head of the University.

A head of a specific department of a university is commonly called a ‘Dean’


#3

[color=red]T-H-A-N-K Y-O-U D-E-A-R B-E-V-E-R-L-E-Y !!!

Your answer is complete and clear, as always.
So, I will use ‘chancellor’, as we also have vice chancellors and the word ‘dean’ is familiar to me.

Would it be right to call a person who is a dean’s right hand a ‘vice dean’? (we have ones in Ukraine)


#4

Yes. Vice-dean is an acceptable term.


#5

Thanks!