Pro-verb: Do you and Don't you are same in meaning?

Hi
In the case of Pro-verb: Do you/Have you? and Don’t you/Haven’t you? under the following context, they have no difference in meaning, don’t they?
Also they are not tag questions. I believe they are proverbs with omitted contents. Am I right?
Thanks in advance.

  1. Do you drink?
    No, I don’t. do you (drink)?

  2. Haven’t you ever smoked before?
    Yes, I have. Haven’t you (ever smoked before)?

  3. You have never asked a guy out before?
    No. Have you (never asked a guy out before)?

  4. I know someone. Do you (know someone)?

  5. I want to kill that guy. Don’t you (want to kill that guy)?

  6. I wish I could kill that guy. Don’t you (wish you could kill that guy)?

  7. I want to kill that guy. (If you were me) Wouldn’t you (want to kill that guy)?

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The examples you quote here are not proverbs. A proverb is an expression or a saying that usually contains a piece of general advice or truth. Here are some examples of proverbs:

Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.
“It’s no use locking the stable door after the horse has bolted.

What have quoted are examples of shortened questions. In a dialogue, if a person asks you a closed question you can answer that question and ask the same question back to the person by only repeating the first part of that question (using the auxiliary verb only).

Please let me know if this makes sense.

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Good day!
Yeap, I mean pro-verbs with the following definition. I am sorry not to know exact grammar terminologies.
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/us/definition/english/pro-verb
image

Anyway, in light of pattern(?), would you say “Do/Have you” and “Don’t/Haven’t you” have no difference in meaning?

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Both have the same function as auxiliary verbs. A sentence in the present perfect requires the auxiliary verb ‘have’ while a sentence in the present simple requires ‘do’.

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Thanks.
I mean In this kind of context, there is no different between Negative questions and Normal Questions?
e.g.)
I want to kill that guy. Don’t you (want to kill that guy)?
I want to kill that guy. Do you (want to kill that guy)?

I want to kill that guy. (If you were me) Wouldn’t you (want to kill that guy)?
I want to kill that guy. (If you were me) Would you (want to kill that guy)?

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In this case the person who asks the question expects a positive answer.

This might be grammatically possible but it’s not very likely because apparently the person asking the question expects the other person to have similar feelings.

This is very unlikely.

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