Painstakingly investigation

Hi!

Recently I came across the word painstakingly. :shock: Now the ending -ly suggestets the word to be an adverb while -ing- referred to the present participle. But what about painstak- ? :?

How to seperate the syllabels? Pain-stak or pains-tak? Probably with with an e behind the k?

Well I started a thoroughful solid and careful investigation and found out that I had to research painstakingly! :wink:

What a word, if you investigate its sense.

Michael

P.S. Now I?ll pull up my stakes for today! Good night! :wink:

Hi Michael,

Am I right in thinking you are referring to taking pains? Isn’t simply that you take pains to do something you take a lot of trouble to do something? Or am I being too simplistic?

Three questions in one posting, I’m afraid.

Alan

Hi Alan!

Yes, you?re right, I referred to taking pains. But not only that since my dictonary suggested pain-staking in the explanations for pain! Furtheron my dictionary suggests a stake to be a post at which the OLD-Red-Indians tortured their enemies before sending them into the happy hunting-grounds!!! :shock: Now, the complete expression I came across was “painstakingly research” and so I wrote this topic since I imagined the torture of such an investigation! :lol:

Beside that I imagined the pronounciation the BFBS would use when saying that word and as I?m an old German babble-head I couldn?t avoid to find it funny. :oops:

Are we singing from the same hymn sheet when I suggest painstakingly to mean rather conscientious or using much attention?

What other interesting word do you or any other member know?

Michael

Hi,

Yes it means paying great attention to detail - almost meticulous.

Alan

Hi

I know the longest (?) computer-related English word with all letters different: uncopyrightable

Hi Michael

You’re right! “Staking pain” does create an odd picture. :shock:

Here’s something you (and Tamara ;)) can do a painstaking investigation of:

How many different English words can you write using only Roman numerals?
I’ll get you started:

DID
LID
CIVIC
8)

Amy

VIVID
MIX

Hi Amy!

Long time ago since we had had our last guessing game, isn?t it? :roll:

Well here are some solutions from me:

MID
DIM
MILL
CIVIL

LIDL you probably don?t accept :lol: as it is the name of a supermarket, do you?

Now I?m keen on learning whether some other members will join this game.

Long time since we talked, isn?t it?

Michael

Hi Michael

Yes, it’s been a while since our last silliness. :lol:

LIDL? :smiley: I think I’ll give you extra credit for that one, Michael, but only if you pronounce it with an English accent. :wink:

I wonder whether anyone can add to Tamara’s and your solutions…

Amy

Children, can I also participate? :smiley:

MILD
ILL

Tom

Hi kids,

MIMIC
DILL

MIDI

By the way, last year my daughter had a teacher (of Technology) from Australia (!) who pronounced LIDL as [laidl] - and UK teens were very amused. :slight_smile:

:lol:
Somehow that sounds exactly right for an Aussie. I can imagine my Australian friends saying it that way, too. I’ll have to ask them for a test pronunciation. :smiley:

By the way, you’re doing quite well with the Roman numeral puzzle, Tamara. Are you a puzzle fan?

Amy

No, Amy, I’m not a puzzle fan at all. But my head is built in a strange way: sometimes it can’t stop and just continues working (investigating :lol:), in itself. With no order :slight_smile: