Optional test (Can the word 'involve' ever be used with 'on'?)

1/ It is not … to learn a foreign language in a week

a. expected
b. expectant
c. expecting

2/ Can the word “involve” ever be used with “on”?

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1–What’s your answer?
2-- Offhand? No.
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For the first question, I choose “expectant” but my teacher said I was wrong.What do you think?

For the second question, excuse me but what do you mean by “Offhand? No.”?
Thanks a lot
Nessie

expected

could you please explain why we should choose “expected” and not “expectant” please?
Thanks a lot
Nessie

please explain more abour your option

Expecting a baby
Expectant mother/ father/ parents
Expect (that)
We call it collocation.

I know but your explaination concerns nothing about my question (+_+)

I’d say the writer of the test is looking for (c) expected, but I really don’t like the sentence very much at all.

This is what I would find more natural for a sentence beginning with “it is not expected”:

It is not expected to rain this week. (= They do not expect it to rain this week.)
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Thanks for your help, Amy. I understand your explaination, but I think the writer of this sentence does not mean that they do not expect (hope,want) to learn a foreign language in a week but they mean learning a language in a week is not possible. In this case, is it not very suitable to say “It is not expected to learn a foreign language in a week” (I mean: it sounds like they don’t want/hope to learn it in a week, not stating the idea of impossibility)

What do you think?

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I understood the same thing, Nessie. Nevertheless, the sentence does not sound natural to my ear. I consider the usage of “it is not expected” to be incorrect in your sentence.

You could say something like this, however:

He is not expected to learn a foreign language in a week.
-OR-
Nobody is expected to learn a foreign language in a week.

Sorry, the word ‘it’ just doesn’t work in the context – unless you’re talking about a thing or an animal (rather than a person) learning a foreign language.
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Thanks Amy, now I understand it. So here which option should we choose?
If expectant is not correct, then there must be no correct answer for this as we can’t use expecting here. “Expecting” has the meaning of “likely, probably”, and I assume we can just say “it is not likely that we can learn a foreign language in a week” but not “it is not likely to learn a foreign language in a week”, right?

That’s just my idea,what’s yours, Amy?

Hi Nessie

As far as I’m concerned, the test sentence is simply a bad test sentence.
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