'neither' or 'either'

Are the below-mentioned sentences correct from grammatical viewpoint.

1-I don’t like spiders. She doesn’t either.

2-I don’t like spiders. Neither does she.

3-I don’t like spiders. Neither she.

4-‘I can’t dance.’ ‘Me neither.’

5-‘I can’t dance.’ ‘I can’t, either.’

Which one is wrong?

  1. This would be correct if you had capitalized the first letter of the second sentence.

  2. This would be correct if you had not capitalized the second word in the second sentence.

  3. This is incorrect because the second sentence lacks a verb.

  4. This is incorrect, although it occurs in informal speech and sometimes writing. The second sentence lacks a verb, and “me” is an objective pronoun, which prevents it from being a subject.

  5. This is correct.

Hi Mordant,
Forget about typos. I’ll correct them.
Thank you very much, indeed.

Hello Richard.
Inquisitiveness is fine, you know. My guess is that this is really the answer you seek…

“I don’t like spiders.” “Me neither.”

Hi, thanks for the revision.

:wink: I’m sure you don’t need to be told anything twice in such a short space of time, Baghee! (It is okay to call you Baghee? Whenever I read your nickname, I keep thinking of Disney’s version of the Jungle Book, when Mowgli turns to Bagheera, who is lounging on a tree branch, pulls his tail, and says, “Come on, Baggy, get with the beat!”)

Of course you can! Besides I’m glad you have a positive association with my nick. :wink:

No, just a practice of making new grammatical structures. :slight_smile:
Thank you Bev.

If you are looking for structures you need to phrase your queries carefully. Your question asked if the sentences were correct from a grammatical viewpoint. As Mordant says, in terms of being a sentence the structure is incorrect. However, in terms of informal conversation it is used a great deal.

Yep, thanks.

HI Mordant,

[color=darkred]Can you explain more on the examples:

1-I don’t like spiders. She doesn’t either.
(This would be correct if you had capitalized the first letter of the second sentence.)
[color=darkred]*** What you meant by ‘capitalized’.?

2-I don’t like spiders. Neither does she.
(This would be correct if you had not capitalized the second word in the second sentence.)
[color=darkred]***What you meant by ‘not capitalized’.?

4-‘I can’t dance.’ ‘Me neither.’
This is incorrect, although it occurs in informal speech and sometimes writing. The second sentence lacks a verb, and “me” is an objective pronoun, which prevents it from being a subject.
[color=darkred]*** How it prevents it from being a subject.

Hello Winice

‘Capitalised’ means used a capital (uppercase form of the letter) for the first letter of the word.
In English, the first word in every sentences begins with a capital letter. It doesn’t matter where on the line the new sentence starts. You still need to use a capital.
You wrote ‘she’ where it should have been ‘She’.

‘Not capitalised’ obviously means the opposite. You wrote ‘Does’ where it should have been ‘does’.

‘Me’ is the object pronoun. ‘I’ is the subject pronoun.
" I can’t dance."
“I can’t either.”
would be the correct grammatical response. At first glance it might appear that Mordant is being a little harsh saying ‘me neither’ is incorrect in this context, as he points out himself, that it is in frequent use, both in speech and writing. However you asked if they were correct from a grammatical viewpoint, rather than whether they are correct in everyday usage, so his response was appropriate.