"I'm on lunch" or "I'm at lunch" which one is correct

Hello all,

When I put a note on my desk “I’m on lunch”, my coworker later approached me and he said that’s wrong grammar. He suggested to use “I’m at lunch” instead to be gramatically correct. I would appreciate any thoughts on this.

Thanks
Danny

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Try, “GONE TO LUNCH.” No errors there.

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i’m at lunch

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im on lunch…

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I’m having lunch, I think,
or maybe I’m eating lunch…
I’m not sure, I never eat lunch…

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Hi,
be at lunch (=not be in your place of work because you are somewhere else having lunch):
I’m afraid he’s at lunch until two.
Bon Appetit!
Morteza

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TO ALL,
good day,‘im on lunch’ and ‘im at lunch’ are both correct…its the significant differences between the use of the word 'lunch’of the two sentences made the verb and the particle unkeep their usual meaning ,because ‘lunch’ can be a verb or a noun…in the sentence ‘im on lunch’; ‘on’ describes an activity or state and ‘lunch’ is a noun… while in the sentence ‘im at lunch’, ‘at’ show the situation somebody or something is in; what somebody is doing or what is happening and in this form of a sentence 'lunch 'is a verb…

AVIC,

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TO ALL,
good day,‘im on lunch’ and ‘im at lunch’ are both correct…its the significant differences between the use of the word 'lunch’of the two sentences made the verb and the particle unkeep their usual meaning ,because ‘lunch’ can be a verb or a noun…in the sentence ‘im on lunch’; ‘on’ describes an activity or state and ‘lunch’ is a noun… while in the sentence ‘im at lunch’, ‘at’ show the situation somebody or something is in; what somebody is doing or what is happening and in this form of a sentence 'lunch 'is a verb…

AVIC

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Hi,
But I don’t think so, do you?
lunch/dinner hour: the period in the middle of the day when people stop work for a meal:
I usually do the crossword in my lunch hour/during the lunch hour.
Best regards,
Morteza

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‘I’m having lunch’ I think.

To take examination

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Hi everybody!

Then if we use the word “lunch” with in , at and on prepostitions? All ways are correct?

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To All,
There’s always an exemption to the rules.If we know how words are formed and what part of speech an existing words belong,we may be able to work out what they mean.The existing word changes when people see or make a connection between things that may seem very different,so in order to use them correctly we need to know where to put the prepositions,phrasal verbs etc.,that the object can go either between the verb and the particle or after the particle…

AVIC,

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Hi Avic

When I use the expression, I would have to say ‘I’m at lunch’, which simply means that you are having your lunch. I don’t quite follow your comment that ‘on/at lunch’ suggests ‘lunch’ is being used here as a verb. Of course ‘lunch’ can be both noun and verb, as is the case with so many words. One other point, I think you need the word ‘exception’ when referring to rules.

Alan

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hi allan,
i went to the message to read and check the word, and yes i agree to the comment ‘exception to the rules’ not exemption…thank you.

“I’m at lunch” is far more common. I have never heard anyone say “I’m on lunch,” but I have heard “I’m on lunch break.”

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Another alternative would be “I’m having lunch”. This way you could avoid the preposition issue altogether.

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If you’re putting a note on your desk, perhaps the ones below are better.

“Out to lunch.” or “Out to lunch. Be back soon.”

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Interestly enough, there is a difference between ‘out to lunch’ (which also happens to be an idiom meaning ‘to behave in a crazy way’) and closed for lunch.

out_to_lunch

closed_for_lunch

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Yes, You’re absolutely right :wink:

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