Idioms: sink one's teeth into VERSUS get one's teeth into

English Idioms and Expressions, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #5 [color=blue]“Call it a day”, question 4

The important thing is that as soon as you saw the advantages, you got your teeth stuck into it.

(a) started to eat
(b) wanted to swallow
© got very interested in
(d) wanted to digest

English Idioms and Expressions, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #5 [color=blue]“Call it a day”, answer 4

The important thing is that as soon as you saw the advantages, you got very interested in it.

Correct answer: © got very interested in

Your answer was: [color=green]correct
[size=200]_________________________[/size]

My best regards and thanks to all my English teachers! For your teachings and considerations.

Just a trifling question. There are idioms: ‘sink one’s teeth into’ or get one’s teeth into’. Can I see ‘get one’s teeth stuck into’ as a derivation of the above two? Or am I putting the trivial above important?

haihao

I am not familiar with “get your teeth stuck into” but I am familiar with “sink one’s teeth into”, which means ‘to become involved in something, especially in an enthusiastic manner’.

I can’t wait to sink my teeth into my new job.

It seems that your English, including idioms, is very similar to North American English. Have you studied primarily N. A. English?

Hi Canadian45,

I am really thankful for your ever considerate and definitude teaching. You are right about my English study background. In fact, some years ago, as my first step to learn English I attended a language school and studied under American teachers. Although I still see my English as rather Japanese English than any English else, maybe my background has put it on more or less an N.A. appearance even if I have read quite a number of British English books.

Thanks again.
haihao

Hi,

There seems to be a variety of ‘teeth’ expressions knocking around here. To my ear there is the expression: ‘Get stuck into something’ suggesting that you tackle a problem or a task with enthusiasm. There is also:‘Get your teeth into something’ having very much the same idea as tackling something enthusiastically. The final expression: ‘Sink your teeth into’ has an entirely different meaning as to me this is what Dracula does when he wants his daily drink of blood!

A

Hi A 8)

Why different? Don’t you think Dracula would drink enthusiastically after tackling his victim? :lol:

Like Canadian45, I’m not at all familiar with the expression “get your teeth stuck into” but it does remind me of an expression I am familiar with: “sink your teeth into”. :smiley:

Amy

And I like the other three options, too! :lol:

Seriously now, I don’t think we always appreciate the whole set of answer choices to its full value. Some can be hilarious! Coming up with all these often absurd options must be the (most?) fun part of test creating.