"economy situation" vs "economic situation"?

Hi,
What do you think about this:

The ___ situation of our country is improving.

a. economy
b. economic

=> I myself choose a because it seems to refer to the economy rather than the situation. What do you think?

Many thanks.
Nessie.

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You need an adjective that can describe the situation. Economic is the adjective, while economy is a noun.

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I agree with Barb.

You should also be careful not to fall into the habit of using the adjective “economical” in that situation, because that means something similar to “frugal” rather than “economic”.

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Thanks a lot, Barb and Jamie,

I know “economical” is wrong is this case, but I really don’t understand why we can’t use “economy” in this case (compound noun).
Anyway I think the phrase means “the situation of the economy” rather than “the situation relating to the economy”…

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Could anybody please clarify for me? I’m so confused… (+_+)

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Please shed some light on this, I’m so dumb now. I just can’t understand when to use a compound noun and when to use an adjective + a noun :((:((:((

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Nessie, I don’t think that in this case there is any other explanation than that we just don’t do it. Theoretically it would be possible in English grammar, but for some unknown reason that isn’t one of the collocations English speakers have chosen to use.

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Hi, Jamie

I daresay that economical is more apt a word to describe someone/something that is thrifty, and on the other hand economic is something pertaining to economy as a field/science.
As in she is economical

Do you find that’s true ?

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Yes, I find that’s true.

Jamie, isn’t “I find”, as used above, rather archaic and literary? :wink:

Really?

Hi Jamie,
So you mean the use of compound noun or an adjective + a noun is a collocation matter, and there’s no rule when to use which? :roll: :roll:

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my answer is ‘economic’

That’s right.

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