conditional

  1. You could get a better job if you spoke English.
  2. You could ask me before you borrow my car.
  3. What would you have done if the train had been late?
    Are these sentences conditional?
    If any one is conditional, which type does it belong to?

1 and 3 are conditionals belonging to Type II and III respectively.
2 is indicative of the speaker’s expectation/suggestion to seek permission. (The sentence is not very intelligible, though)

I too think that sentence 2 doesn’t make much sense.[YSaerTTEW443543]

TOEIC listening, photographs: A produce cart[YSaerTTEW443543]

‘Could’ used in that sentence can be interpreted as a little sarcastic. You would usually say: You could at least ask me before you borrow my car. That would be the polite thing to do!

In my view ‘You could at least ask me before you wish to borrow my car’ would be still better.

You are simply embellishing the statement. It isn’t inherently ‘better’. There is intended sarcasm in the comment - the car has been borrowed and permission wasn’t asked for.

I see. You are right if it implies that it was said after the car was lent. However, I could not get that sarcastic meaning.

  1. I was so angry I could have killed her.
  2. I could have won the race if I hadn’t fallen.
  3. I couldn’t have won, so I didn’t go in the race.
    Are these sentences conditional?
    If they are conditional, what type are they?

Only 2 is conditional and it is Type - III.

Anglophile,

  1. If I had the money, I could buy you a bike. (present tense)
  2. If I had the money, I could have bought you a bike. (past tense)
  3. If I was having money, I could buy you a bike. (future tense)
    Are all these conditional sentences?
    Are the tenses written in the brackets correct?
    Please comment. Thanks.
  1. If I had the money, I could buy you a bike. (unreal past)
  2. If I had had the money, I could have bought you a bike. (unrealized past)
    (By the money I believe you mean the money required)
    (‘If I was having money’ in 3 does not seem to be standard English)

As it is marked ‘future tense’ then perhaps this is meant:
If I were to get the money, I could buy you a bike.

I disagree that (1) is necessarily past. It could be a present conditional (If I had the money right now.)

“You are simply embellishing the statement. It isn’t inherently ‘better’. There is intended sarcasm in the comment - the car has been borrowed and permission wasn’t asked for.”

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It’s a bit confusing for non-natives. Isn’t it better to put it like that: You could at least ask me before you have borrowed my car.?

There is some confusion about the “before you borrow my car”: is it about the future borrowing or is it about borrowing as such, stated in the simple present?

‘have borrowed’ is not the correct tense there. ‘… before you borrowed…’ as indicated, is correct. I’m sorry that we cannot change that to make it less confusing for learners.

The person has already borrowed the car - it is in the past, though it is possible that they haven’t returned it yet.

“You could at least ask me before you borrow my car.”

I think that that sentence has a logical deficiency. You can’t borrow a car without asking the lender to agree to that. The ‘borrower’ simply took the car without notifying the ‘lender’ who, in fact, is absent here. I’d rewrite it like that: You should at least have asked me before you had taken my car.

That is not correct.

The person took the car with the intention of returning it. That is borrowing it whether or not he asked.
Your suggested rewrite sounds awkward and ‘befoire you had taken’ is not the best tense to use here.

Beeesneees,
“You should at least have asked me before you took my car.”
In this sentence, are tenses OK?

I would agree to your version. That was why I modified it as before you wish to borrow. The verb ‘borrow’ does not suit in the original sentence.

I’m a non-native so I’m lacking in a native intuition. I’ve just deducted that such a use of the Past Perfect is acceptable as it is in often cited sentence:He started to complain before he had walked 5 miles.

Hi Allifathima, I wonder if you might have wanted to say the following

You should have asked me before using my car.