worse vs. the worst

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #177 [color=blue]“Comparatives and Superlatives (1)”, question 4

Kevin is bad, but Norah is .

(a) worst
(b) worse
© more bad

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #177 [color=blue]“Comparatives and Superlatives (1)”, answer 4

Kevin is bad, but Norah is worse.

Correct answer: (b) worse

Your answer was: [color=red]incorrect
Kevin is bad, but Norah is worst.
[size=200]_________________________[/size]

Hi there,
Could you please explain to me when to use worst and when to use worse?

Many thanks

“worse” is used when comparing two of something. One is worse than the other one.
“worst” is used when comparing three or more of something. One is the worst of the three or more.

I disagree,

This car is worse than the other two you showed me last time (three things)

I think the difference is that “worse” is a comparative word, and “worst” is a superlative word.
If A is worse than B, it doesn’t mean that A is the worst. But if A is the worst then A is definitely worse than B (and C and D, etc.)

Ok then. Now is much more clear for me. Thank you.

[quote=“Our Tort System”]
I disagree,

This car is worse than the other two you showed me last time (three things)[color=blue]That statement is correct, but that is not the usual situation for explaining "worse and “worst”. “worst” is used when there are three or more things of different ‘qualities’.

I think the difference is that “worse” is a comparative word, and “worst” is a superlative word. [color=blue]yes, of course
If A is worse than B, it doesn’t mean that A is the worst. If you are comparing only two things, you wouldn’t use “worst”. But if A is the worst then A is definitely worse than B (and C and D, etc. [color=blue]of course)