What does the word AMIBUOUS mean if ever?


#1

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #880 [color=blue]“The Blue Gotto of Capri”, question 8

weather conditions are not ideal for visitors to the Grotto. Sudden waves can cause the small boats to be thrown upward toward the roof of the cave, or trap the occupants inside for hours or days.

(a) Amibuous
(b) Opaque
© Cloudy
(d) Adverse

Correct answer: (d) Adverse
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What does the word [color=red]AMIBUOUS mean if ever?


#2

‘If ever’? Do you mean ‘if anything’? Nothing that I know of; the text needs fixing. Thanks, Abeille.


#3

I’ve fixed it and several other problems in that test now, Abeille. The corrected version will appear with our next database update. Thanks again, and if you find any others, please let us know; it is much appreciated.


#4

Oh, thanks for pointing that out, it was exactly what I meant but doubted the correctness.
And my another thank for attention to spelling blunders.

[color=olive]Taking the opportunity I’d like to ask a question about the word ‘Deliver!’ when exclaimed as a toast (heard it in a BBC TV show). What’s the etymology and occasions of use?


#5

I’ve never heard that toast, sorry. Maybe one of our BrE members will respond.


#6

I’ve never heard it either.


#7

Maybe it was a particularly alcoholic occasion and they were drinking a toast to “the liver!”


#8

LOL Thredder!


#9

My belated thanks to you all.
‘Deliver!’ is still in the shade and I can’t let it go because I distinctly heard it said.
The story ran as follows: two at the bar, a woman and her acquaintance, in a short while the woman’s father joins them; they have a small talk, eventually the newcomer lifts his glass in a gesture of a toast, utters ‘Deliver!’ and leaves.
I might be mistaken but it was so clearly pronounced that I lost my rest looking for an answer (usage & etymology) :slight_smile:

Another interesting clash is with a word ‘gesundheit!’ meaning ‘bless you!’ (when smb sneezes). I somehow came across it in the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. It said the word is used informally in AmE. Very funny, indeed. The German word Gesundheit stands for health and apparently Americans loaned it to substitute for ‘bless you!’ but why and is it widespread?


#10

Could it have been part of a larger plot within the programme. Was the father asking his daughter to deliver some part of a bargain, or to make good on a promise?

And, yes, use of ‘gesundheit!’ meaning ‘bless you!’ is widespread.


#11

Thank you, Beeesneees


#12

correct sentence:
Adverse weather conditions are not ideal for visitors to the Grotto. Sudden waves can cause the small boats to be thrown upward toward the roof of the cave or trap the occupants inside for hours or days.

Correct answer: (d) Adverse

Your answer was: incorrect
your sentence:
Ambiguous weather conditions are not ideal for visitors to the Grotto. Sudden waves can cause the small boats to be thrown upward toward the roof of the cave or trap the occupants inside for hours or days.


#13

Hello Hezz,

Did you want to ask a question about that?

Adverse - harmful, unfavourable… for example, storm, high wind.
Ambiguous - unclear, inexact… so this is not an appropriate choice.


#14

Yes, sorry I wrote the question in the subject.

Thanks for the answer.


#15

The subject line is very difficult to read, Hezz. Please include all relevant text within the message box in the future. Thanks.


#16

Sorry Hezz, I never pay any attention to the changes in a subject line. Luckily, I see my guess at what you wanted to know was correct.


#17

Hi MM,

Had you also noticed that the title of this test is misspelled?

Should be ‘G[size=117]r[/size]otto’, but the title of the test has this misspelled as ‘Gotto’.

[color=darkblue]___________________________________________________________
[size=75]“Picasso had his pink period and his blue period. I am in my blonde period right now.” ~ Hugh Hefner[/size]


#18

Haw! Nope, thanks. Just fixed it. I’m not getting email notice again, either, it seems.


#19

Well, it’s good to see that.


#20

Welcome to English-test.net, Ethan. Good to see what?