waste away

Do both these uses of waste away sound OK?

[i]She wasted away for a few weeks until he returned.

He wasted away in just a few weeks. It was a sad loss to the world of football.[/i]

Is it homework?

MrP

No. it’s headwork. What’s your thoughts on those sentences?

Georgie Best’s girlfriend whilst he was in hospital.

Georgie Best before he forever left the hospital.

Thanks, Ralf.

Who’s Georgie Best, BTW?

Here, the particle expresses perfectivity:

Molly drank her wine up.

So here the particle really doesn’t work:

*?Molly drank her wine up a bit.

Why is it that “away” works in both these?

[i]She wasted away for a few weeks until he returned.

He wasted away in just a few weeks. It was a sad loss to the world of football.[/i]

Note:

  1. ???She wasted for a few weeks until he returned.

  2. ???He wasted in just a few weeks. It was a sad loss to the world of football.

But:

  1. He drank his wine.
  2. He drank his wine up.

MrP

Both examples for ‘drink up’ sound quite unnatural when used in the simple past. Use ‘emptied’.

Molly emptied the wine.

Connotational differences can often be observed with prepositions or words in general.

Really? So we’d have to write “Molly emptied her wine”?

How about here, R?

He drank up and left.

Of course, but what do you think that connotational differences are there?

I’m aware of this usage : He wasted away his life.

Yes, me too. I’d normally hear it as “He wasted his life away” though.

[color=green]He drank up and left.

That’s your new example. Nothing wrong with it. But it’s different from your old one.

Your old example’s a bit odd, but you’d get away with it.

That’s what I said.

Sounds a bit formal or literary.

Not if written in the “full” form:

He drank up his wine and left.

What is it that makes you say “He drank up and left” is OK, but not “He drank up his wine and left”?

Hi guys

How about finished off instead of “emptied” or “drank up”;

[i]He finished off his wine and left.

Or He finished his wine off and left[/i].

cheers stew.t.

An option indeed, but what’s wrong with Ralf’s suggestion?

Hi Molly

Nothing, really.

I would more use “emptied”, if I wanted to imply I want another drink. It is some guys round, so I say;

I´ve an empty glass, mate.
Or
I´ve emptied my glass , mate

And if used for the context suggested would more use finish off, but this could be personal nuances for contextual usage.

cheers stew.t.

That makes sense. And do you agree with Ralf that “drink up” sounds odd in the past tense?

Please stop misquoting me. I commented on this quote of yours

You this what you said is.

OK, Ralf, I’ll try again. In which of these sentences does “drank up” sound odd and why?

“Molly drank up and left.”
“Molly drank up her wine and left.”
“Molly drank her wine up.”

They’re all odd. Molly never leaves.