Tick tock - a sound you know well from clocks and watches

These are the words that i spoke in my recording. Your task is to put them into sentences with the right punctuation -

Time flies you cannot they move at such irregular intervals.

Good luck!

Alan

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Hello, Alan, many thanks for the wonderful story about time which originated in the city with famous Big Ben and maybe it`s Big Ben who whispered you the words and you told them to us. Time flies, they cannot move you at such irregular intervals.

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As I understand, the task is to just add punctuation to the words so as to create several sentences. If I understand correctly, we are not allowed to change the order of the words. So your suggestion doesn’t work I’m afraid. What do you think?

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But Alan said this is a puzzle, therefore we should be allowed to change the order of the words so that they fit in our sentences and obviously, we have to add the right punctuation.

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Aha, nice ) I really doubted that that was correct, but as at that moment I was reading Alice in Wonderland, and after listened the discussion of professors why this book is for adults, and how Carrol 150 ago described the examples of the theory of relativity of time in his book, in this context I rearranged words, thinking of Alice, of course it doesnt make sence and correct variants maybe are the following Time flies you cannot, they move at such irregular intervals. or Time flies you cannot. They move at such irregular intervals. What do you think Torsten?

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In my humble opinion, the only way to create at least grammatically correct sentences with this sequence of words is this: ‘Time flies. You cannot. They move at such irregular intervals.’ But this would mean that there isn’t any contextual connection between them.

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This is a bit of a cheat, I’m afraid.

In the first sentence ‘time’ is used as a verb and this is an implied question -

Time flies? (measure how long flies take to move from one place to another?) You cannot. (It isn’t possible to time their movements). They (the flies) move at such irregular intervals (that’s why it isn’t possible).

Alan

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Now I got it and it makes sense :+1:

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Great story and very interesting puzzle! Thank you Alan :grin:
I want to start to transcribe the recording, here is the first part (about 30 seconds):
Tick tock, tick tock, tick tock… Do you know what I’m talking about? I’m talking about the way we describe the sound of watches and clocks maybe. And of course, the important thing for another word they tell us is time.

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Yes, the puzzle is great! I wouldn’t have thought at this solution ever. Because of “time flies” which is weird…
Maybe it would be better to write it “time-flies”, meaning flies who show the time? Or is it ok the way it is?

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As Alan has already written the question ‘time flies?’ is perfect English making perfect sense. It shows how versatile the English language really is. As he has explained, ‘time’ here means ‘measure’ as in ‘I timed myself running five hundred meters and was very happy with the result’.

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Oh yes, thank you, I understand. It’s perfect now.

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And I assume in written German it’s tik-tak, while in Ro. it’s tic-tac.

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Hello!
Tick tock, tick tock, tick tock!
Do you know what I’m talking about? I’m talking about the way we describe the sound of watches and clocks maybe. And of course, the important thing, the four-letter word they tell us, is the time.

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Actually, I think it’s spelled ‘tick tack’ or even ‘ticktack’ in German and it’s regarded as an interjection.

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Interjection, indeed.

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Let’s continue transcribing the story of the time, or it will be soon forgotten…

Time is represented as a picture when we see an old man with a long white beard who is carying a scythe which is a long handled curved knife or blade which is used to cut corn or grass.
And when we see him, we realise how important time is.
It’s used in lots of expressions, we talk about getting time off, which means we have free time from our job, or what we usually do, we can take our time, which means that we relax, we don’t rush, and there is also the expression doing time, which means that you are in prison.

The old man Time, described in the story:
father_time3

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The American way is tick tock, exactly as Alan says.
I heard it in a movie with Sandra Bullock on TV this evening.
:blush:

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