the oldest and largest trees in the world are found in California

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #219 [color=blue]“Grammar and Vocabulary Practice: California (1)”, question 4

Some of the oldest and largest trees in the world are in California. The Redwoods, on the California coast, are the tallest trees and the largest ones are located in Sequoia National Forest.

(a) lived
(b) found
© grow
(d) existing

English Grammar Tests, Elementary Level

ESL/EFL Test #219 [color=blue]“Grammar and Vocabulary Practice: California (1)”, answer 4

Some of the oldest and largest trees in the world are found in California. The Redwoods, on the California coast, are the tallest trees and the largest ones are located in Sequoia National Forest.

Correct answer: (b) found

Your answer was: [color=red]incorrect
Some of the oldest and largest trees in the world are existing in California. The Redwoods, on the California coast, are the tallest trees and the largest ones are located in Sequoia National Forest.
[size=200]_________________________[/size]

Hi, I have a question?
why doesn’t “existing” work here?

Hi,

The verb ‘exist’ is not usually used in the continuous form because the meaning of the verb itself already indicates the idea of continuing. If you wanted to use the verb and mean that the trees are still there, you would use the simple form:

Some of the oldest and largest trees in the world exist in California.

Alan

Thank you Alan,
Studying English in this site is WONDERFUL.
I have another question. I posted it in the forum, but on-one replied me.
What does disposition in “Geographic disposition” refer to?
I looked for it in the dictionary. Here’s what I got:
[C usually singular] the particular type of character which a person naturally has
She is of a nervous/cheerful/sunny disposition.
• [S + to infinitive] formal a natural tendency to do something, or to have or develop something
a disposition to deceive

Unfortunately, it seems to me that none of them fit in my context.
Thanks in advance

I think ‘natural tendency’ might well fit, but I suspect thast we’d need to see more context.

Many thanks Alan , I wanted to ask the same question so exist is not usually used in the continuous form . I didn’t know.