structure of lead

This event in his hometown _______ the group.
A) led Dr Smith into organizing
B) led Dr Smith to organizing
C) led Dr Smith to organize
D) led Dr Smith in organizing

These choices are made up by myself, for I want to learn the structure of lead. My question is:

  1. Are they all correct?
  2. Of the correct choices, are there any difference in meaning?

I’d appreciate it very much if you could help me out.

Many thanks in advance.

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To me, only C is correct, with A an iffy possibility.
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Thank you, Mister Micawber.

Maybe I should have posted only the four choices rather than that question.
A) led Dr Smith into organizing
B) led Dr Smith to organizing
C) led Dr Smith to organize
D) led Dr Smith in organizing

Here please let me restart my question:

  1. Are they all correct structures?
  2. Of the correct ones, are there any difference in meaning?

Thanks again!

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No difference in meaning between A and C.
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so B & D are wrong structures.

Thank you!

Hi MM,
I just want to know why isn’t it “lead somebody to doing something”, because the common structure is “lead somebody to somthing” (something = gerund)

Many thanks
Nessie

Hi Nessie

English does not work like a collection of mathematical formulas. Often the context and the meanings of the words themselves will influence what structure is possible or not.

Why don’t you try writing some sentences using the structure you want to know about and then post your sentences here for comment and input?
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Oh, surely I don’t think of English as a collection of mathematical fomulas, Amy, I just ask about the usage of “lead somebody to doing something” because there is a usage of the word “lead” as “lead somebody to something” and so I wonder if “something” here can be a gerund (You see, like "object to something/doing something). However I checked it on the BNC and found no result for it, so now I’m contented with "lead somebody to do something :stuck_out_tongue: