Speacial usage of 'would have V-ed"

Please read this exercise :
Sentence rewriting:
1.I find it surprising that she didn’t like her present.
==> I would…
And here is my answer "I would have thought that she LIKED her present.’’
But the correct one is "I would have thought that she WOULD HAVE LIKED her present.’
After reading two phrase written in capitals ,please explain for me why ‘‘she liked’’ isn’t true and the usage of ‘‘would have…’’ in this situation.

she doesn’t like her present - "I would have thought that she LIKED her present.’’
she didn’t like her present - "I would have thought that she WOULD HAVE LIKED her present.’

But they are not conditional sentences ?

If you’d asked me, I would have said that…

counterfactuals

Forgive my stupidity ,but I don’t understand what you mean.As I looked up in the Cambridge dictionary
dictionary.cambridge.org/define. … &dict=CALD and I used ‘‘would have thought…’’ as it says,but I really don’t understand it.I would very glad if you explain them for me .the two ‘‘would have…’’ Here is my problem

Please help me as soon as possible.

I don’t see your problem.

Before you revealed the truth to me, I would’ve thought she would’ve liked her present.

Forgive my stupidity ,but I don’t understand what you mean.As I looked up in the Cambridge dictionary
dictionary.cambridge.org/define. … &dict=CALD and I used ‘‘would have thought…’’ as it says,but I really don’t understand it.I would very glad if you explain them for me .the two ‘‘would have…’’ Here is my problem

By the way ,I don’t understand what ‘‘counterfactuals’’ means

We call this (WOULD HAVE LIKED) Future in the Past. You think (now) she will like the present. Referring to the Past, will becomes would.

or not? :slight_smile:

But ‘‘I find it surprising that she didn’t like her present’’ has the same meaning as "I would have thought that she WOULD HAVE LIKED her present’’ and I think with the difference in tense they would be not equal at all.

Hi all

Maybe we should look at a few variations of the sentence and the meanings:

  1. I think she will like her present.
    I know that there is a plan to give her a present in the future. It is my opinion that she will like it. However, she hasn’t received the present yet and I don’t know for a fact that she will like it.

2. I thought she would like her present.
Both halves of this sentence are factual: It tells you factually what I thought in the past (up to now or before she got her present) and it accurately reports my past prediction. This sentence follows a standard pattern for ‘reported speech’. What I thought before is now finished. I know something different now. Now I know that she didn’t like her present when she received it.

  1. I would have thought that she would have liked her present.
    Both halves of the sentence refer to an unreal past – neither half is factual because neither actually happened. It suggests that before now, I didn’t know that there was a plan to give here a present and therefore it was not possible for me to have an opinion about whether she would like it when she received it. However, if you had asked me (in the past) to predict the future (her reaction), I would have predicted a reaction that was different from the past reaction that you’ve just now told me about. The fact that she didn’t like her present is surprising to me because it is not the reaction I would have otherwise expected.

I don’t know whether any of the above helps, but nevertheless that’s my two cents.
:wink:

“Knowing her, I would have thought that she would have liked that present.”

So,does the sentence ‘‘I would have thought that she would have liked her present.’’ sounds natural to you ,Amy ?

It would sound more natural to me this way:

I’d’ve thought she’d’ve liked her present.

And if you needed emphasis for any reason?

Wow, that’s a mouthful, Amy :lol: It would be a cold day in hell when I pronounce this phrase in the same breath.

:lol:
Hi Alex

Actually, what those contractions often sound like in spoken AmE is something like this:

I’d’ve = I-da
she’d’ve = she-da

These sorts of contractions are quite common in spoken English, but they are rarely mentioned in ESL books.

I bet if you continue to listen to Bart closely, you’ll hear these types of contractions.
.

Thank you very very very much !It helped solving my problem.Thank you :smiley: