Should it be *her husband's*?

Answering to a comment on her post, Esther shared that the man is a friend of hers and her husband.

Should it be her husband’s ?

Thanks.

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No, I would say that the sentence is correct as it is.

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Reacting to a comment on her post, Esther shared that the man is a friend of hers and her husband.
(I do not think ‘answering to’ is grammatically and collocationally good English)

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Thanks for bringing this up, Lawrence. I hadn’t noticed it. Here is another option:

In response to a comment on her post, Esther shared that the man is a friend of her and her husband.

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‘Her’ is already the possessive form of ‘she’. Does adding an ‘s’ make sense?
On the other hand, ‘husband’ is not possessive.

Does the word order matter?

Her friend
Friend of her

Her husband’s friend
Friend of her husband - Friend of her husband’s

John’s friend
Friend of John - Friend of John’s

Regardless of what is “correct”, people commonly say it with and without the ‘s’…

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Yes, but we also have:
a friend of mine
a friend of yours
a friend of hers
a friend of his
a friend of ours
a friend of theirs

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I hear people say it different ways. I hear all of the following, but I think the ones on the left are more common.

a friend of mine
a friend of yours
a friend of hers - a friend of her
a friend of his - a friend of him
a friend of ours - a friend of us
a friend of theirs - a friend of them

I confuse myself by thinking about these things too much. When I think too much it doesn’t flow naturally.

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But when the pronoun is used, we usually use it in its possessive form.

We do not add the apostrophe and ‘s’ with other words like a name or husband, wife, brother etc.

Of course, even if we do not use a possessive pronoun, the meaning is clear (a friend of me or him) but it does not synchronise with the normal usage we are familiar with!

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