"say in two minds" = hesitate?

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #71 [color=blue]“Two For You”, question 3

Quite honestly I really can’t decide which one to choose – I’m what you might say in two .

(a) minds
(b) thoughts
© ideas
(d) views

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #71 [color=blue]“Two For You”, answer 3

Quite honestly I really can’t decide which one to choose – I’m what you might say in two minds.

Correct answer: (a) minds

Your answer was: [color=green]correct
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hi, does this mean to hesitate
?
ildiko

.
The definition is actually provided in the test question. It means you are not able to decide

By the way, I know this idiom as “be of two minds”. The first time I heard of this idiom being used with the preposition ‘in’ was in this test. :shock:

It may well be that “be in two minds” is mainly a British usage, and “be of two minds” is the American usage.
.

Thank You very much,
Ildiko.