Sarah's occupation is a secretary of the president in this compnay?

Hi everyone,

  1. Sarah’s occupation [color=blue]is a secretary of the president in this compnay.
  2. Sarah’s occupation [color=blue]is being a secretary of the president in this compnay.

I simply want to say the truth that Sarah is a secretary. What’s the difference between these two sentences? Which one would you say if you were me? Or what does native speaker say?

Thanks a lot.

Maggie :oops:

Hi Maggie,

Both sentences seem to me to be a bit of a mouthful!

Sentence (1) You can’t really say: someone’s occupation is a secretary and I’m not too happy with of. You could say: Sarah’s occupation is that of a secretary to the president of/in this company. You certainly wouldn’t say is being. Why not simply say: Sarah is employed as a secretary to the president of/in this company ?

Alan

Hi Alan,

I actually would like to make a sentence with “occupation”. So if I say below,

[color=blue] What kind of occupation are you looking for?

Does it make sense? If not, would you mind giving an example as well?

Thanks a lot!!

Maggie^^

Hi Maggie,

Your sentence: What kind of occupation are you looking for? is fine. The word ‘occupation’ is invariably used in questions asked by officials seeking information from someone. The question would be simply: And your occupation? The word is also used in forms that you have to fill up asking what sort of job you have.

Alan