Questions

  1. I read about it in some book or other, does it matter ___it was?

A.what. B which

  1. I don’t know how we ___through the hard time.

    A.get through B. Go through

  2. ----what did he say on the phone?
    ------he informed me that he ____for china the week before last.

    A.left. B had left

Thanks

Do you have any ideas about the answers?

  1. I chose what. I doesn’t seem to me to be a choice within a certain range. I feel that it is the same as “I read about it in some book. Does it matter what it was?”

  2. I chose “get”. By the way , why is it not “I don’t know how we are going to get through the hard time?” Why simple tense?

  3. I chose “had left”. It seems to me there is a time gap.

Thanks

  1. I chose what. I doesn’t seem to me to be a choice within a certain range. I feel that it is the same as “I read about it in some book. Does it matter what it was?”

  2. I chose “get”. By the way , why is it not “I don’t know how we are going to get through the hard time?” Why simple tense?

  3. I chose “had left”. It seems to me there is a time gap.

Thanks

You chose correctly for 1 and 2 (though in 2 it should usually be ‘times’)

A and B could both be acceptable for 3, because it would depend on what has happened since.

  1. “does it matter which it was?” means “which book?”. “does it matter what it was?” is talking about the nature of the thing read. The impression is that both parties already know “what it was”, so on that basis “which” seems more likely. However, it seems a pretty poor question to me. Also, there is a suspicion of a comma splice.

  2. “get through” is presumably the expected answer (present tense referring to regular/habitual behaviour). However, it should be “get through the hard times” (regular behaviour, therefore more than one occurrence). Does the book say “time”, or did you mistype it?

  3. Both are possible. Sentences should begin with capital letters. Also, “China” should be capitalised since it is a proper noun.

For 3, what’s the difference in meaning between A and B?

Hi Ruifeng,

Using ‘left’ is a simple statement where the ‘informing’ (informed) and the leaving (left) were both at the same time. ‘Had left’ is reported speech where the speaker was informed about what the other person ‘had done’ previously.

Alan

Q:

1.Could you tell me what " it would depend on what has happened since" means, Bev?

  1. You said I chose correctly. Do you agree with Dozy on 1? Because I thought which was not correct. Hehe.

Q:

  1. For question 1, I thought “in some book or other” meant the same as “in some book”. If so, it would not be a choice, it would simple mean to say what [color=black]the book was doesn’t matter.

  2. For question 2, if it means regular behaviour, why use “[color=red]the”? What do you mean “Presumably the expected answer?” Seems like you have something on your mind about it. Pray tell. Hehe

  3. Thanks for the advice.

“in some book or other” means about the same as “in some book” (it is slighly more casual and dismissive). Sorry, I don’t really understand what you mean by your second sentence. “does it matter which it was?” means “does it matter which book I read about it in?”. “which” refers to the choice of one book out of the unknown number of books implied by “some book or other”.

That is not a very easy question to answer. The assumption is that periods of hardship do occur, and those are the ones we are talking about, hence the definite article.

When inserting the “correct” answer, the resulting sentence is not natural, hence my lack of total enthusiasm for the answer. (By the way, you didn’t answer my earlier question: does the book actually say “time” or “times”?)

It is “time”. But I think it’s a typo. Hehe

Thanks