one, less than one and more than one.

Hi,

Please have a look at these:

  1. One orange is rotten. => OK because this is one orange.
  2. 1/2 of the orange is rotten. => OK because this is less than one
  3. 3/2 of the oranges are rotten => OK
  4. 20 per cent of the students here are female => OK

Please give me a check.
Thank you very much.
Nessie.

Hi Nessie

Grammatically, your sentences are fine. BUT…

[color=red]3. 3/2 of the oranges are rotten. :shock:

Do you mean 150% of the oranges? (That seems to be what you’ve written. But how is that possible?)

Or did you mean two thirds (2/3) of the oranges?
.

Oh I’m sorry Amy. Yes, I mean 2/3 :smiley:
Now talking about “2/3 of the oranges”, I think there are 2 ways of understanding:

  1. 2/3 of the oranges are rotten (we are talking about a certain number of oranges - for example 9 oranges, and 6 of them are rotten)
  2. 2/3 of the oranges is rotten (we are talking about one orange of which 2/3 is rotten.

What do you think?

As for:

20 per cent of the students here are female => OK

What about this, Amy:
1 per cent of the students here (be) female.
=> we say one percent, but the number of female students may be greater than one, so…)

By the way, did you guys know that 3 out of 2 people have problems with fractions? :lol:

Thanks a lot, Barb :slight_smile:
And how about this:

1 per cent of the students here (be) female.

Hi,

Another question has arisen in my mind:
Is it all right to use “one orange of which 2/3 is rotten”? (I know “one orange, 2/3 of which is rotten” is quite correct - just like “she has 3 sisters, two of whom are married”, but I’m not sure whether “one orange of which 2/3 is rotten” is correct or not - and I have no idea why I used it the other day :lol: )