Once you + simple present, you + simple present/simple future?

I’ve noticed that we can use a zero conditional type of syntax to describe future events.

Once you start, you aren’t going back.
Instead of:
Once you start, you won’t be going back

When the show starts (this evening), you are all hyped up.
Instead of:
When the show starts (this evening), you’ll be all hyped up.

Hopefully, I don’t look like an idiot when I’m done
Instead of:
Hopefully, I won’t look like an idiot when I’m done

Are these informal colloquial forms or are they acceptable in formal written English?

These are all grammatically correct. Only the first pair and third pair are equivalent, though. The sentences on the show are different, and the first should not have “this evening.” The phrasing indicates general behavior. This is like saying “You are hyped up tomorrow.”

None of these make it in formal written English, because they contain contractions and informal phrases like “hyped up.” Also, many object to “done” in descriptions of people. A number of dictionaries don’t permit this use. Many also object to “hopefully,” which is indisputably correct, however. That is a matter of style, but it does have an informal air. Of course the final pair needs periods. The first pair works in moderately formal English. The final pair works pretty well in moderately formal English. The second pair is plainly informal.

I’ve noticed that we can use a zero conditional type of syntax to describe future events.

[color=blue]Once you start, you aren’t going back. – Is general behavior too? I’ve seen people using it to refer to a purely future context. For instance, "You only have this one chance, once you start you are not going back.

[color=blue]Hopefully, I don’t look like an idiot when I’m done – This obviously refers to the future and it has ‘when’ just like the second pair. Why is this acceptable while “When the show starts (this evening), you + present tense” is not possible?

Lycen, the verb “to be” does not work that way. That is why it does not work. “When the show starts, you are all hyped up” does not indicate future action. You must say “will be” or “are going to be.”

When the show starts, you are all hyped up" does not indicate future action, Does it indicate the present action or it is never used in this way, always in future tense. I though we use “when” to talk sth in the past or sth in the future, It cannot describe sth happens in present. Could you explain me more ?

Why not? I mean the following is acceptable.

If/When it occurs again (future), I am out of here/ you are so dead etc.

It does work in those two instances. But note that “I am out of here” is inherently about the future. It is never literal. We don’t say “we’re out of here” when we actually are. It means “I am leaving.” The same thinking is also true of “you are so dead.” It means “I am going to kill you.” These are, of course, both very informal.

You cannot say “When that happens again, you are on the porch” or “When that happens again, you are pale.”

But it’s absolute okay to say ‘Hopefully, I don’t look like an idiot when I’m done’ without the future tense?

Lycen, the sentence with “hopefully” is fine. I would still prefer “will not,” though.

Ok, thanks!

When we use “Hope” - we , here, use - Will.

---- I hope you will go to the U.S. soon.

We don’t use:
---- I hope you are gone to the U.S. soon

I know that we usually use the present tense after ‘I hope’. It’s written in my Cambridge English Grammar book. ‘Will’ is also possible. But I’m not sure if it applies to sentences starting with ‘hopefully’.

Therefore,

I hope you go to the U.S. soon = I hope you will go to the U.S. soon[/list]

In speech, “hopefully” is probably more common with the present tense. In writing, I would guess, “will” is more common as formality increases. The thing about that is that as formality increases, “hopefully” decreases altogether.