once again

[color=red]a. Once again, a man was arrested for dressing up as a woman.
b. A man was once again arrested for dressing up as a woman.
c. A man was arrested for dressing up as a woman again.
d. A man was arrested for dressing up as a woman, again.

The sentences are mine.
As far as I know, in some places that is illegal.

In which cases:

  1. it was the same man
  2. he was arrested again
  3. he dressed up as a woman again

My feeling is that:
In (a), we have a different man. I don’t think (a) would be used if the same man was arrested again.
In (b) it is the same man and he is being arrested again.
In © it is the same man, Maybe he was arrested again or maybe he had dressed up as a woman again
(d) could have any of the meanings.

Many thanks and happy holidays.

Your logic is correct about (a) and (b).
Also, in (b) it’s possible that previous arrests were for something other than dressing as a woman, though the likelihood is that it was the same offence. as otherwise the sentence would probably include … once again arrested, this time for dressing…

In © he has dressed up as a woman again, not he was arrested again.
(d) would not be used.

In all the sentences in this context I would not include ‘up’. I would just say ‘for dressing as a woman’.
‘Dressing up’ tends to convey the idea that it was a costume, for example, for a part in the theatre, a carnical, fancy-dress, etc.