Loose vs. lose (adjective vs verb)

Hi,

Many ESL learners (and even native speakers) have trouble distinguishing between ‘lose’ and ‘loose’. In most cases, people write ‘loose’ when they actually mean ‘lose’. That’s why Alan has written lose vs. loose and I hope you’ll enjoy it as much as I did.

Thanks,
Torsten

Hi Torsten!
What do you mean by to be halfway up the drain pipe? The story is good and very helpful to learn vocabulary. So thanks so much.
Jose

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Hi Jose, here you can find explanations and pictures about drain pipe climbing.
insectnation.org/projects/ni … /c132.html

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I got it what is loose and what lose? Thanks

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like this one a lot. A bunch of thanks

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Hi,

It’s again one of the short and sweet essays. Not only do I benefit from these essays but they help me teach better. I also enjoy the humour in each of these essays.

Cheers!

Sona

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Hi,

It’s again one of the short and sweet essays. Not only do I benefit from these essays but they help me teach better. I also enjoy the humour in each of these essays.

Cheers!

Sona

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thank you for the explanation.

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Loose - Lose
Dear Alan Townend,
Thanks for the excellent explanation. What a way to teach!
Aneeqa

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Dear Alan
I write to you first time. I finish learning English in private course and I hope this is the way I improve my English.Your explanation about loose and lose is great. So, thak you very much and I have goodwil to improve my english.
Dragisa

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lose lost lost
loose!
I’m lost!
pp of a verb play as this: I’m lost!
tight! loose!
The life on this planet! may get tight! for us! that we are in the middle of skies and earth!
Maybe living of some people on the earth is very loose!!!
I’m lost!

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Hi

That was great. Honestly speaking, I was kind of persons who really got lost whether lose is true or loose fits better. Thanks your effort and enthusiastic to learn English to us.

I have a question which is not related to those words but I would be grateful to explain it to and that is that the author used the adverb “incidentally” in the beginning of some sentences without a comma afterward. Is it true or not to put comma after an adverb which comes in the start of a sentence? Any way, would you please get some lessons about punctuation?

Tanx

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Dear Alan,
I really appreciate your interesting and valuable essay about the words: “loose” (adjective) and “lose” (verb) and the examples were very clear too.
Thanks a lot!

My best regards,

Cesar lopez Petrovich.

Hi, i really do appreciate your various articles. keep on the good work.
Thanks a lot.
Louis

Thanks a lot.

Hi,that was great. thank you for the explanation.

whose screws loose here

Hi
Thank you for your useful essay.It really help me to learn better.
best regards.
parnaz

Dear Alan:

Merry christmas!!! Thanks a lot for the clear explanation. I always got confused with these 2 words!!! But no anymore. It helps me a lot to teach my students better and feel more confident.
Again, it is always so rewarding to read your essays.

Have the best New year of all!!! i will be willing forward receiving your next “difficult pairs” ha ha!!!

Kind Regards

Georgina

hi torsten and everybody.
I just have read the article and it was interesting. These articles are short and very clearly, besides the examples are funny. Thanks a lot for sending them us to improve our learning process.
regards!