last day + simple future + tomorrow

Hi, I would like to ask about the following:

My last day of work will be tomorrow.

Is it correct to use the simple future when the day has already been decided? Should it be “My last day of work is tomorrow” instead?

Thank you.

Either is acceptable in the context you describe.

I suppose the ‘will’ here is not the future ‘will’?

Yes, it is. Tomorrow is in the future.

I don’t get it. My last day of work isn’t tomorrow (at the moment). My last day will be tomorrow (sometime in the future)?

‘Tomorrow’ cannot be defined as ‘at the moment’. Neither can it be ‘some time in the future’. ‘Tomorrow’ is the very next day - the immediate future.

The use of present tense to indicate a future date as a statement of fact is acceptable:
My last day of work is (going to be) February 3rd.
My last day of work is (going to be) next Friday.

But you can also use ‘will be’ because it is in the future:
My last day of work will be February 3rd.
My last day of work will be next Friday.

The further away from the present time the date mentions is, the more likely it is that the future tense will be used.

But my last day of work has been confirmed. It is tomorrow - talking about the identity. Why is ‘will be’ acceptable? ‘Will be’ tells us it will happen in the future. It’s like saying, “My last day will eventually be tomorrow”.

If it’s the other way around - Tomorrow will be my last day - that makes absolute sense because it’s similar to sentences like “Tomorrow will be a fine/happy day”.

Regardless of whether it has been confirmed or not, tomorrow is still the future, so the future tense is an acceptable option.

If you can see the sense in:
tomorrow will be my last day
then
my last day will be tomorrow
also has to make sense.

These are all correct:
My last day is tomorrow. / Tomorrow is my last day.
My last day will be tomorrow. / Tomorrow will be my last day.
My last day is next Friday. / Next Friday will be my last day.
My last day is February 1st. / February 1st is my last day.

Sorry to bother you again, this is my perspective of the topic:

My last day is tomorrow vs. Tomorrow is my last day.
Is Just Like
Jon is the class monitor vs. The class monitor is Jon.

We are talking about identity. The positional switch between subject and object doesn’t matter. Former sentence = latter sentence

However,
My last day will be tomorrow vs. Tomorrow will be my last day

Tomorrow(because subject is future time) will be(therefore future tense) my last day.

My last day will be tomorrow = My last day will be tomorrow in the future
Is just like
Jon will be a prefect = Jon will be a prefect in the future.

The subjects are different and that makes a difference. Herein lies my problem in understanding your point.

‘John will be a prefect tomorrow.’ ‘Tomorrow, John will be a prefect.’
relates to
‘Tomorrow will be my last day’ / ‘Tomorrow, it will be my last day.’.

My last day will be tomorrow / John will be a prefect tomorrow. <-- as you say

I think you are making things more difficult by not accepting that there are two possible ways of saying something. Also, you seem to keep changing your mind about whether you find ‘is’ or ‘will be’ most acceptable.

No I didn’t keep changing my mind. You could have misunderstood again.

‘Is’ is definitely acceptable; not the focus.

‘Will be’ is the crux of this thread.

You have changed my example; subjects are not the same. I compared
My last day will be tomorrow. (And not ‘Tomorrow will be my last day’)
with
Jon will be a prefect <-- Jon isn’t a prefect yet

‘My last day (which is tomorrow) will be enjoyable’ sounds reasonable. With ‘My last day will be tomorrow’ is it trying to say that my last day isn’t tomorrow right now but will eventually be?

I didn’t change your example – I corrected it. The phrases which you thought went together didn’t match, so I gave you an indication of the phrases which did. However, as you are returning to the point, perhaps you would prefer this for a more straightforward comparison:
John will be a prefect <-- John isn’t a prefect yet.
My last day will be tomorrow <-- My last day isn’t yet.

Not at all. ‘Tomorrow’ is the future regardless of what tense you use with the verb. The sentence is an alternative to ‘My last day is tomorrow’ and to all intents and purposes carries the same meaning.

Instead of saying “Jon will be a prefect.”
Can I say: “Jon will be prefect(adj).” ?

Thanks a lot

Don’t you think the verb ‘to be’ needs an adjective or noun to come after it?
Subject + ‘to be’ + object/state + time indicator?
Jon + will be + a prefect + tomorrow
My last day+ will be + ??? + tomorrow

This is what I found on Google:

‘My last day will be tomorrow’ - 4220 results
‘My last day is tomorrow’ - 54,800 results
‘Tomorrow is my last day’ - 899,000 results
‘Tomorrow will be my last day’ - 550,000 results

It gives an indication that ‘My last will be tomorrow’ is not as popular as the others for some reason. Maybe, it doesn’t make sense to many too? I would use the bottom 3 but not the first one. Similar patterns for other pronouns; ‘last day will be tomorrow’ with the least entries.

no.

‘Prefect’ isn’t an adjective. I think you are confusing it with ‘perfect’.

Obviously I don’t from my previous messages in this thread.

'Will be is common enough as an alternative to 'is. I have nothing more to add and don’t see the point in chasing this argument round in ever-decreasing circles.
Either you accept my word, or you don’t.

Yes I can accept it if it’s not the future ‘will’, but as in the ‘will’ for confirmation/insistence e.g. I will answer the door (now). You said that it’s a future ‘will’.

Since it’s not as common as the other 3, I’ll just go with others then. Language is kind of abstract anyway. I apologize for eliciting precious responses from you.

Hi Lycen.

I think the adjective is meant to be ‘previous’.

Alan

Then I apologise for the hassle I have caused

Mr. Beeesneees,
Thanks for clearing my confusion.
Can I say ‘prefect’ is a monitor in a class?