Joke-III

Uncle: What are you searching under steel bero?
Ramu : Elephant, uncle.
Uncle: What? Can an elephant hide under steel bero?
Ramu : I mean the chess coin - elephant(=rook)?

Please comment on this joke.
In India, rook (chess coin) is called elephant.
Please help me to make the sentences more idiomatic.

To: All coaches,
I believe my wordings in the above joke do not invoke your comments.
So I assume that it is OK.

So I go further one step forward to present another joke: Here it is:

Lover: Why are you in a hurry to go home so soon?
Do you expect your parents return home from the tour?
Love: No my dear. Only my children would have returned home from school.

I’m afraid there are no elephants in chess (at least in a standard 8x8 chess set).
But we have a knight/bishop/king/queen and they would work in your joke.

A rook is a chess piece too and also a bird but as a bird it’s small and can easily fit under a bero I suppose.

BTW, they are called chess pieces, not coins.

Uncle: What are you searching for under the steel bero?
Ramu : I’m searching for a knight/bishop/king/queen, uncle.
Uncle: What? How can a knight/bishop/king/queen hide under the steel bero?
Ramu : I meant the chess piece.

No, it isn’t OK. As far as the English is concerned, it should be:

Uncle: What are you searching/looking for under the … ? [“steel bero” makes no sense to me; “searching for” is correct English, but “looking for” feels slightly more idiomatic in this conversational situation]
Ramu: An elephant, uncle.
Uncle: What? Can an elephant hide under a …?
Ramu: I mean the chess piece.

However, this makes zero sense in English because the chess piece is not called an “elephant”. You would have to think of another name that could be misunderstood, possibly “rook” misunderstood as the bird. However, it would be a pretty feeble joke in English, I think.

Yes, I think your ideas are better than my suggestion of rook.

But could you tell me, what is a “bero”?

Hi Dozy,

Thanks!

I had no idea what a bero was either. So I had to google it, and it appears to resemble a large steel safe. :)))

I couldn’t find it in a dictionary, so I guess it’s not even an English word. Hehe.

PS: It must be an indian word because my google search turned up a bunch of indian sites.

Our Tort System/Dozy,
In India ‘bero’ is a steel cabinet. It is a sort of Indian English.
The rook(= elephant) is the first chess piece in the first row corners.
I think now it may be clear to you and easily follow the joke.
OK. Since it is understood by all Indians, we can forget it.

Please comment on the next joke:
Lover: Why are you in a hurry to go home so soon?
Do you expect your parents return home from the tour?
Love: No my dear. Only my children would have returned home from school.

When I first read this, I immediately thought that “bero” was either a misspelling of “bureau” or a corruption of the same word. :slight_smile:

Our Tort System/Dozy,
Please comment on the next joke:
Lover: Why are you in a hurry to go home so soon?
Do you expect your parents return home from the tour?
Love: No my dear. Only my children would have returned home from school.

Dozy/Our Tort System,
You two have just abandoned me in the middle.
Please remember to guide me.
Thanks for your help.

I couldn’t think of a way to make it funny in English. In fact, I’m not sure I even understand it. Is the joke that that the first person doesn’t realise the second person has children?

Dozy,
You are correct.
The lover has no idea that his love was already married and got children.
So now you have got full idea. Please make it funny in English.
Thanks.

I don’t think it’s strong enough in English to be worth bothering with. Plenty of people have affairs with people who are married and have children. There is nothing in the joke to show that the first person doesn’t know this, and, to me, the punchline just falls flat. It might work better in a longer scene which builds up to a surprise at the end.

Dozy,
You are correct. It is the cultural difference between Indian and European.
That is why your feelings are different from mine. That is OK.

Please see below. Could you find it humorous? Please correct.

Principal: Why are you late to the college?
Staff: Bike puncture, sir.
Principal: Why don’t you come by bus?
Staff: I don’t have the (financial) capacity to buy a bus.

Luschen,
Please comment on the above and correct my English. Thanks.