Is this question correct: "What did they used to make?"

Hello friends,

Few years ago I came across this in a comic strip.I don’t think it’s grammatically correct, but would like you all to check this out:

“What did they used to make?”

Assuming ‘used to’ denotes customary/frequent re/action ( as in " I’m used to that.") can it be used in presence of another past tense - ‘did’ - in same sentence?
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Another request is for clear rules if any for the use of “compared to” or “compared with”.

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Another:

"I heard you the first time. "

I’d like to know where should the stress be, on ’ heard’, or on ’ first’, always assuming this is said sarcastically ; or come to think of it, is it always spoken with sarcasm, or exasperation or similar feeling/s too can be denoted here?

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Lastly, to lighten things up a bit, this:

Me And You are Friends.
You Smile, I Smile.
You Hurt, I Hurt.
You Cry, I Cry.
You Jump Off A Bridge…
I’m Gonna Miss Your E-Mails :wink:

Satish.

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What used you to make? – formal, esp BrE
What did they use to make? – informal
What did they used to make? – alternate spelling, frowned on my some.

Compare to = suggest or state a similarity.
Compare with = examine or set forth the details of a supposed similarity.

These are Fowler’s distinctions, which I doubt are worth following these days.

I heard you the first time.-- Yes, usually with exasperation, I think.
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Thank you , Sir, for taking up my query.

Any more inputs from those listening in? I’ll be grateful for further elaboration.Thank you in advance, for your time.

One more:

" When one analyses some of the several analyses that have been offered… "

Until it dawned on me that the two " analyses " peacefully co-existing in this sentence were,respectively , third person singular of the verb ‘analyse’, and , plural of the noun ‘analysis’ (from the same verb) , this statement had me stumped. Remarkable, isn’t it?

The question is, are there any more instances of this type of similar verb-forms/nouns/adjectives in English? If yes, are they sufficient in number for being grouped under a particular name,and if so, what’s it called?
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Your turn,

Satish.

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They are stress homographs, and there are a lot of them in English. More information here: http://www.marlodge.supanet.com/wordlist/homogrph.html.
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My, that was quick, Sir.

Thanks a lot, again.

Satish.

" Unknown, I know ; but… unknowable ? "

Hello, it’s me again.

Another day, another doubt…

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About the verb " to market" ,which is usually used to mean:

to

(1) engage in commerce, sale etc.,
(2) buy household supplies etc., and
(3) Deal in a market.

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Would it be correct to use it in all three senses, i.e . sale &/or buy ? Did it originally mean that way, or has popular usage over time expanded its meaning?

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Thank you for your time,

Satish.

Good marketing involves maintaining in the customer’s mind the delusion that the buying decision was entirely his own.

Hello all,

What’s correct here ? Is it :

…me neither / neither me , or

…nor me, or

…not me either ?

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Another of those slippery customers:

Is it 'economic ’ , or ‘economical’ ?

Apart from the context, which may not always be clear, any other fool-proof way to choose?
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Satish.

" The concept of Gross National Product has always been just that : too gross for some highly refined intellects, as in this room ."