Interested

Beeesneees,
If this sentence ‘I’m interested to find out what she did with all that money.’ is correct,
how do you brand ‘I am interested to learn to cook.’ incorrect?
Please clarify me.
Thanks.

To me, it looks acceptable.

I’m interested in learning cookery.

It seems you did not look closely enough at the answer I gave to Foreigner about that sentence.

I do not find it acceptable.

Beeesneees,
‘If this sentence ‘I’m interested to find out what she did with all that money.’ is correct,
how do you brand ‘I am interested to learn to cook.’ incorrect?’
Is the above sentence grammatically correct?
Or should I write as below?:
‘If this sentence ‘I’m interested to find out what she did with all that money.’ is correct,
how do you brand ‘I am interested to learn to cook.’ is incorrect?’
Thanks.

“how do you brand” is incorrect, so the versions with and without ‘is’ are both wrong. The latter [art of your question should be something like:

… how can you argue/say that ‘I am interested to learn to cook.’ is incorrect?

If you MUST use brand then:
… how can you brand ‘I am interested to learn to cook’ as correct?
would be acceptable.

Beeesneees,

  1. It may interest you to know that Mary didn’t accept the job.
  2. I was interested to hear the news about the election. (passive)
  3. I was interested to read his report. (passive)
    Are they all wrong?
    Please comment. Thanks.

No, they are correct.

Once again it looks as if you are trying to take one phrase and make a rule which applies to all structures/patterns containing that phrase.

Beeesneees,
Please teach me in what way these sentences are different from other previous sentences.
a. ‘I am interested to learn cookery.’
b. ‘I am interested to learn to cook.’
Are these sentences wrong?
I am just confused. Please elaborate more so that I can pick up the lesson.
Thanks.

How many times and ways do you need to be told that as far as I am concerned they are wrong?

I am interested in learning cookery.
I am interested in learning to cook.

Beeesneees,

  1. I am interested to learn cookery.
  2. I am interested to read his report.
    These two sentences’ pattern is the same.
    Then how come #1 is wrong while #2 is correct?
    Please explain so that I can understand easily.
    Thanks.

Now that you have used ‘I am interested’ instead of ‘I was interested’ (which is what you used earlier) I wouldn’t use (2).
It is passable in the past tense but does not work in the present tense.

Beeesneees,

  1. I was interested to learn to cook.
  2. I was interested to learn cookery/cooking.
  3. I was interested to find out what she did with all that money.
    I have changed the tenses into past tense. Are they now OK?
    Please explain why they are wrong in present tense?
    Thanks.

no
yes
yes

All I can tell you is that the context makes a difference. This has gone on for three pages now. Perhaps you should just follow the advice to use the -ing form in these circumstances instead of trying to squeeze a square peg into a round hole.