indicated

  1. Raman indicated to police the men who attacked him also shot at him.
  2. Raman indicated the men to police, who attacked him also shot at him.
    Are both correct?

The first sentence reads better as “Raman indicated to police that the men who attacked him also shot at him.” In principle it is possible to omit “that”, but in this case it makes the sentence awkward.

It is possible, however, that you mean “Raman indicated to police the men who attacked him and shot at him”, which has a different meaning (means that he pointed out the men to the police, rather than told the police that they had also shot at him).

You could also consider using the past perfect “had attacked … had shot”.

The second sentence is not right.

Hi Allifathima,

I am not quite sure what your use of ‘indicate’ is in your sentences. Do you mean ‘inform’ or do you mean ‘point out’? This could affect the structure of the sentences.

Alan

Shouldn’t this read ‘to the police’?[YSaerTTEW443543]

TOEFL listening discussions: A conversation between a student and a university advisor[YSaerTTEW443543]

Not necessarily. If certain specific police are meant then it would be “the police”. If some non-specific police are meant then both “the police” and “police” may be used. Dropping the article can give a journalistic feel.