in like a Flynn

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #519 [color=blue]“English Slang Idioms (103)”, question 7

“Hey, Jacob, did you hear Jackie quit? She was the only one here who might have been a rival for the new supervisor position. Now that she is gone, you are like Flynn!” Rick told him.

(a) popular
(b) Guaranteed
© in
(d) looking good

English Language Proficiency Tests, Advanced Level

ESL/EFL Test #519 [color=blue]“English Slang Idioms (103)”, answer 7

“Hey, Jacob, did you hear Jackie quit? She was the only one here who might have been a rival for the new supervisor position. Now that she is gone, you are in like Flynn!” Rick told him.

Correct answer: © in
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This is an interesting idiom.Is “Flynn” a person.?I would like to know what’s the story behind him. I will be waiting for your answer.

‘in like Flynn’ apparently Dates back to 1945, refering to how easily movie star Errol Flynn could get women into bed with him.

usingenglish.com/reference/i … flynn.html

I don’t believe it’s a common expression in the UK, though I have heard of it, thanks to some American publications.

Hi Beeesneees,

as to my dictionary, your expalanation is the second and call it as Australian source.

The first sends us back to 40s of the former century and bind it with Edward J. Flynn who was an American lawyer and politician. Flynn was a leading Democratic politician of the mid-1900s.

From Wikipedia: “The phrase “in like Flynn” has sometimes been claimed to be a reference to Flynn, though its folk etymology more frequently associates it with actor Errol Flynn. Etymologist Eric Partridge presents evidence that candidates Flynn backed were almost automatically “in,” citing usage during Flynn’s life that refers to him.

Vladimir.