"in last year" vs. "last year"

English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #203 [color=blue]“Prepositions of Time and Date (1)”, question 5

last year, the weather was really bad. This year, the forecast is better.

(a) In
(b) (none)
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English Language Tests, Intermediate level

ESL/EFL Test #203 [color=blue]“Prepositions of Time and Date (1)”, answer 5

Last year, the weather was really bad. This year, the forecast is better.

Correct answer: (b) (none)

Your answer was: [color=red]incorrect
In last year, the weather was really bad. This year, the forecast is better.
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Dear Sir

why not “in last year” here?

thanks a lot in advance

Christina’s son

Such adverbs of time as"last night",“last year”,"last month"and etc.are used without any preposition.

Hi Christina’s son,
I agree with Pamela that words such as “next, this or last” - when used with “time” - indicate that no preposition is necessary.
So, when you see something like “this month, last year, next week,” you don’t need a preposition before it.
However, Pamela, I don’t think that words such as ‘this, last and next’ are adverbs of time but rather adjectives because "year’ is a noun and not a verb. :slight_smile:
I hope that helps.
Linda

Linda,when analyising a sentence according to the parts of sentence “last month”, “last year” (etc.)stand for adverbial modifiers of time and according to parts of speech,they’re adverbs.These adverbs are considered as a single idea while analysing.
Anyway I’d like to know Amy’s opinion!

Hi Pamela,

I’d agree with you that “time phrases” such as ‘last year’, ‘next month’, etc. would be considered adverbial.

Amy

Thanks a lot,Amy !