If I weren't late, I wouldn't be fired.

[color=blue]If I weren’t late, I wouldn’t be fired.

This sentence tells us:
a. I am late and the boss will sack me.
or
b. I am late and the boss has sacked me already.

a is the paraphrase of the blue sentence or b?

I think your blue sentence should be “If I hadn’t been late, I wouldn’t have been fired.”

In that case b. would be true.

[color=red]It’s the same grammar as ‘If he weren’t so lazy, he wouldn’t be broke.’

[color=red]“broke” means ‘having no money’.

I agree with Lurchen.

If I weren’t late, I wouldn’t be fired.

Fired using here is incorrect. Fired is not a Normal Adj as the member Bazza’s reply which I read it weeks ago (sorry I did not remember exactly the member’s name, the reply he gave is very good). So It can not go with the linking verb to be as normal Adj does. It should be “I wouldn’t have been fired”. Fire should be use as verb form - Past participle.

After checking, It was your question in another article, Sb70012. So I do not need to say much about it. That’s funny.

[quote=“Waiyin Cheng”]
I agree with Lurchen. [color=blue]That’s your privilege, even though I don’t agree with much of what you said.
We were presented with the following sentence and we have to decide if it is (acceptable)(correct).

[color=blue]“If I weren’t late, I wouldn’t be fired.[color=blue]”

Fired using here is incorrect. Fired is not a Normal Adj[color=blue] I don’t agree. Very many -ed past tense verbs can function as adjectives.
‘Put the completed forms on this table.’ ‘All fired people will receive three month’s salary.’ ‘He is fired; she is hired.’
If some -ed adjectives are less common, as “fired” is, that doesn’t make them incorrect.

‘Fired’ does not describe an ongoing situation satisfactorily, so “If I weren’t late, I wouldn’t be fired” doesn’t work particularly well and there are better alternatives.

If I weren’t late, I wouldn’t have been fired.
If I hadn’t been late, I wouldn’t have been fired.
If I hadn’t been late, I would not be getting fired now.