I showed up places

#1

I showed up places looking like I was homeless. (Megan)
What does the phrase “show up places” mean?

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#2

It means I showed up at/went to/appeared in/at places. Please let me know if this makes sense. Regards, Torsten

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#3

Is it showed up places or showed up at places? Even in the explanation Torsten uses at. Please examine it, Sitifan. The preposition seems to be necessary.

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#4

https://books.google.com.tw/books?id=8RBDDQAAQBAJ&pg=PA142&dq="I+showed+up+places+looking+like+I+was+homeless."&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjB6PSEhpTiAhX-yosBHZ33BC8Q6AEIKTAA#v=onepage&q="I%20showed%20up%20places%20looking%20like%20I%20was%20homeless."&f=false

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#5

I think in spoken English the preposition is redundant as in ‘this guy is really going places’ or the following passage: "My first therapist explained, “People with children like this don’t go to those places. That’s why you don’t see them. That’s why you feel so different!” I now wonder— where were those other moms? Were they at home— alone?

When I showed up places, people often cleared away, other kids acted afraid— I acted afraid."

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#6

As Torsten has already explained, ‘show up’ suggests ‘appear at’ or ‘make an appearance’. The most common use of ‘show up’ is used in a negative way as in - A large crowd was expected to turn up to see the President but because he was very unpopular, only a few people showed up. The omission of the preposition with ‘places’ is quite often used in everyday speech - I’ve been (to) places (visited) you’ve never heard of. She is seen (in/at) places where celebrities like to go. He is certainly going places now that he has won the world championship (the suggestion is that he is going to become even more successful).

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#7

Thank you, Alan and Torsten, for clarifying that it is normal in everyday speech or spoken English.

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#8

Thanks for the source. The position stands clarified now.

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#9

I wonder if ‘going places’ and ‘showing up places’ follows the same pattern as ‘talking money’? I mean, leaving out the preposition. What do you think? Many thanks, Torsten

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#10

I don’t think that’s the same structure. I would say that ‘money’ is a straightforward direct object. Examples -

Talking sense, rubbish, politics, finance and so on.

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