I don't think we are yet to see

Hi,
The following sounds a bit contradictory to me if you convert it into simple sentences:
“England crucially remain in contention to progress. I don’t think we are yet to see a consistent performance over 90 minutes here in Poland and James Ward-Prowse told me after Monday’s game that he feels they’re yet to reach their full potential.”

1–“I don’t think we are yet to see a consistent performance” =I don’t think we’ll see.
The previous reference doesn’t hint at any consistency: “After managing just one shot on target in the 0-0 draw with Sweden in their group opener, England again looked lightweight in attack. They were ponderous in possession and lacked invention.”
–It could also be interpreted as “I give up on them.”
2–“…he feels they’re yet to reach their full potential” =there’s still room for improvement as far as their performance is concerned.

–Altogether, I can’t interpret his idea other than England are consistent in their inconsistency. Did I miss anything?

1 Like

Should be “We are yet to see…” or “I don’t think we have yet seen…” Not, “I don’t think we are yet to see…”
As written it doesn’t make sense. Looks as if the commentator started to use one phrase, then changed his mind mid-sentence and finished with the other phrase in the heat of the moment.