Finish each of the following sentences in such a way that it means exactly the sa

Hello teachers,
Please help me to check and correct this exercise. Thank you!

Finish each of the following sentences in such a way that it means exactly the same as the sentence printed before it.

  1. Richard is the tallest student in my class.
    No one is tall as Richard in my class.
  2. I have never smoked a cigarette.
    It’s a truth that I have never smoked.
  3. We did not go on holiday because my children were busy with their entrance exams to university.
    ` If my children were not busy with their entrance exams to university, we would had go on holiday.
  4. Women, but men, were not allowed to complete in the First Olympic Games.
    Only men were allowed to complete in the First Olympic Games.
  5. This song was composed and recorded by John Lennon.
    John Lennon composed and recorded this song.
  6. Tom asked Jane if she knew how to use the machine.
    Tom asked “Jane, how to use this machine?”
  7. Roses can’t possibly grow in such poor soil.
    It is impossible to grow in such poor soil.
  8. Diana was killed in a traffic accident in Paris in 1997.
    It was in 1997, when Diana was killed in a traffic accident in Paris.
  9. I don’t understand what this letter is all about.
    I can’t make what this letter is all about.
    10. I had just finished the test when the teacher collected it.
    No sooner did the teacher collect the test than I had just finished it.
  1. No one else is tall as Richard in my class.
  2. I have never smoked a cigarette.– Try again
  3. If my children had not been busy with their entrance exams to university, we would have gone on holiday.
  4. Tom asked, “Jane, do you know how to use this machine?”
  5. It is impossible to grow roses in such poor soil.
    8.It was in 1997 that Diana was killed in a traffic accident in Paris.
  6. I can’t make what this letter is all about.

No sooner had I finished the test than the teacher collected it.

  1. No one else is as tall as Richard in my class.

  2. I can’t make out what this letter is all about.

Can I use an inversion to rewrite the second sentence?

  1. I have never smoked cigarettes.

?

Thanks

Hello E2e4,

We need to make a sentence which starts with the given words “It’s…”

Hello Hoadong,

I don’t see how an inversion would help. In fact if you have to begin the rewritten sentence with “It’s…” I don’t see how you can do it without changing the meaning.

I thought the same, Bee, until I noticed that this might be (just might be) a peculiar use of Present Perfect. Only when it’s the case, can this sentence the done.

“I have never smoked a cigarette.” (but I’M SMOKING right now, at the moment of utterance)

It’s used to describe an action beginnning in the past and finishing at the moment of speaking. Some more examples:

“I haven’t seen you for ages.” (but I see you now)
“This room hasn’t been cleaned for a month.” (but we are cleaning it now)

If that’s the case, then Hoadong’s sentence can be transformed into:

“It’s the first time I have smoked/am smoking cigarette.”

Honestly, considering that I’m just a learner, I’m not very confident with my explanation and would like to hear more from native speakers :).

Thanks all of you for your help.
Atomos, your explanation is same as my friend’s.

Hi Hoadong and Atomos,

In that case the test sentence is flawed. It should read:
I have never smoked a cigarette before.

Then Atomos’s suggestion makes sense.
Taking it all into consideration, I would guess that the mistake is in the question.

Dear Beeesneees,

Yes, you are right that the mistake is in the question. Thank you!

  1. It is true that I have not smoked any cigarettes.

Hi Liucik,
Using ‘true’ changes the meaning from the original sentence.

Did you mean lacking the word ‘before’ would imply that the action might not be in progress at the time of speaking?

That’s right. Removing the word ‘before’ indicates that the person has never, ever smoked a cigarette, either in the past or currently.

What is “before” here? A preposition, maybe?

In addition could this be said

I haven’t smoked a single cigarette yet.

Thanks

You could use ‘yet’ but it implies that there is a likelihood that you will smoke one in the future.

The exception is that sometimes people add ‘yet’ to a statement where they have no intention of doing the thing in the future but wish to create a humorous effect:
I haven’t driven off a cliff - yet!

Thank you.