Do you understand?

He usally comes to know his schedule changes the day before or two days ealier before the actual day…

Do you understand what I am saying here?
If not, what is the right way to ask the question?

He usually finds out about any schedule changes one or two days earlier than the appointments* are meant to take place.

  • I’ve used ‘appointments’ but if that is not appropriate you will have to substitute it for something else. I cannot tell what is or isn’t appropriate without additional context.

“He usually finds out about any schedule changes one or two days earlier than the *appointments.”

The word ‘appointments’ can be used when you have appointment with somebody in office right?

If so, I need to find another word. The sentence’s situation is this:

Arron works on Monday through Friday from 8 am to 5 pm. However, his regular schedule always changes. Sometimes he needs to be at work early which is 6 or 7 am. Sometimes he needs to work overtime like 9 or 10 pm.
And the thing is he usually finds out about his schedule changes one or two days before the day…

Do you think the word ‘appointment’ works for in this situation? or should I use different word?

In that case, all you need is this:

He usually finds out about any schedule changes one or two days in advance.

It will be understood that this means in advance of the days he is working that particular schedule change.

Thank you.