difference between 'to get used to' and 'to be used to'

I would like to know what the difference between these two sentences is:

I am used to watching TV

I get used to watching TV

Thank you.

“I’m used to watching TV.” means that you have already got used to it.
“I get used to watching TV.” means you haven’t completely got used to it.

Thank you for your answer MR Harry Smiith
Unfortunately I couldn’t understand it very well. Please can you simplify it or help me in another way
Thank you

Hi, assile

As for me, I dont think there’s any difference.
Anyway, I think we should stick to what the native English speakers say, so let’s wait for them to answer :slight_smile:

Get used to something describes a process while be used to something is a result. That’s why it makes more sense to say I’m getting used to watching TV.[YSaerTTEW443543]

TOEIC listening, photographs: At the supermarket[YSaerTTEW443543]

My explanation was just what you say, only in other words. :smiley:

Hi Harry

Using the simple present tense (get used to) is not the same as using the present continuous. The use of the simple present tense in Assile’s sentence really doesn’t make much sense – the simple present tense would actually suggest multiple complete processes.
.

I think there is no continuous tense there. What do you mean? 8)

Hi Harry,

I think what Amy means is that the sentence “I get used to watching TV” sounds rather unnatural.[YSaerTTEW443543]

TOEIC listening, photographs: Make up time[YSaerTTEW443543]

Hi Torsten

Yes, you’re right.

Hi Harry

My comment was in support of the very valid comment that Torsten had offered in his first post. Torsten pointed out that it would be more logical to use am getting used to (i.e. the present continuous tense) in Assile’s sentence, and I agree with that.
.

I also think that we should say: I am used to doing something instead of I get used to doing it. but the question is what’s the difference between them. I think both Torsten and I have the same opinion.

Thank you for your answer MR Harry Smiith
Unfortunately I couldn’t understand it very well. Please can you simplify it or help me in another way
Thank you

Thank you for your answers.
I am convinced now and your explanations helped me to understand the meaning of these two sentences.
:smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

Hi Harry

As I’ve mentioned, one of the differences between them is that “I get used to watching TV” suggests multiple complete activities/processes. As the sentence stands, it should be interpreted as meaning that “I” have gone through the the complete process of “get used to watching TV” on a number of occasions. There is no indication as to what the current state actually is. It’s entirely possible that the person is currently in the “used to” state. We simply don’t know.

I am getting used to watching TV” would refer to a (one) current, incomplete process.

I am used to watching TV” refers to a (one) current state.
.

Hi assile,

It might be easier to change the pronoun from ‘I’ to ‘you’ to get the sense between these two and use a different text:

The first could refer to the sound of aeroplanes passing over your house. You could say:

We have lived in this house for 10 years and we are used to hearing the planes overhead (it is not a problem because we don’t notice them now)

The second could also refer to the sound of aeroplanes. You could say:

You get used to hearing the planes overhead (that’s a fact) in the end.

Alan

HI,

Thank you MR ALAN for your help

Now I really get the real meaning of these two expressions.

I appreciate your help.

And thank you for MR Torsten AND MR Harry Smiith and for the Communicators.

to dear alan
your explanation was excellent and complete.

thanks so much