Did she wake up when he got up?

Hello teachers,
The context:
[color=blue]At three o’clock in the morning Alex got up from the bed and looked out of the window. Olivia opened her eyes. ‘Are you … Are you leaving now?’ she asked.
Is this question natural?
Did Olivia wake up when Alex got up? Explain your answer using reported speech.
Yes she did. She had opened her eyes and asked if Alex was leaving then.

Thanks in advance.

It’s okay but to explain the answer reported speech is not necessary:

Yes, she did. The text indicates that she opened her eyes (and spoke).

Hello Beeesneees,
Thanks for your reply.
Really? Hmm … then I should only write, ‘Explain your answer.’, and nothing else? Sorry, but I have a question about that: the text has quoted ‘Are you … Are you leaving now?’ Isn’t that direct speech and shouldn’t it be changed to reported speech as the answer indicates. I’m sure there’s a logical answer for your advice, I just don’t see it. :frowning:
On the other side, I would like the students to answer something else besides ‘Yes, she did’.

RtL

RTL said Alex had got up from the bed and looked out of the window at 3 o’ clock in the morning when Olivia opened her eyes and asked if he (Alex) was leaving then. RTL wanted to know whether Olivia had woken up when Alex had got up. RTL was told that she had. (This might be a long-winding avoidable explanation; just for academic interest.)

If you ask a student to ‘explain your answer’ then you are asking them to expand upon the yes/no element, so they will need to write more than ‘Yes, she did’ or ‘No, she didn’t’.

Although what the text reports is direct speech, which can be changed to reported speech, there is no need for the student to make any mention of what was said in order to answer the question you have asked. You have only asked whether Olivia woke up and there are a number of things there to indicate that she did aside from what she actually said.

You have obviously completely misunderstood RtL’s purpose in providing a context. The students are expected to read a book then answer questions. RtL has quoted the pertinent paragraph as the forum users are not reading the book.
I really don’t see why you have chosen to paraphrase what people can read for themselves, particularly as your message is less understandable than the original was.

Hello Beeeseees,
Wow! That’s quite an explanation! Thank you so much. How about this question, will it work too?
The context:
[color=blue]At three o’clock in the morning Alex got up from the bed and looked out of the window. Olivia opened her eyes. ‘Are you … Are you leaving now?’ she asked.
Is this question natural?
What did Olivia want to know after Alex got out from the bed?
She wanted to know if Alex was going to leave.

RtL

This would be more natural:

What did Olivia want to know after Alex got up?
What did Olivia want to know after Alex got out of bed?

She wanted to know if Alex was going to leave.
She wanted to know if Alex was leaving.