despite, inspite of, although, though, unless, unlike, nonetheless, nevertherless

Dear readers,
I would like if somebody can give some few examples of each and explain the usage in a convenient manner?
Thks in advance.

Hi,
Despite/In spite of all my efforts to pass my exam,I failed.
Although/Though it was snowing,we went on a picnic.
I won’t go to her party unless she invites me(=if she doesn’t invite me).
Unlike him,I’m interested in running./Sharks are unlike any other fish.
The region was beautiful;nonethless/nevertheless,they couldn’t spend the rest of their life there.
Best regards,
Morteza

Hi Morteza,
Thank u so much helping and providing me with the examples.
I got them.
thks a lot my friend.
Mahendra

Can nonetheless/nevertheless be replaced by “however”??

Most of the time, yes. Did you have a particular example in mind, WinterLite?

Actually, I don’t understand it at all about the usage of nonetheless/nevertheless…
Can you explain it a little bit more detail? Is there any conditions whenever I use nonetheless/nevertheless?

And I got an example…

“The Yankees scored four runs in the ninth inning. The new Red Sox relief pitcher, nonetheless/nevertheless, looks like a promising addition to the team.”

Can I say this “The Yankees … pitcher, but/however, IT looks like a promising addition to the team.”??

In this example, despite the fact that the Yankees did well, the commentator acknowledged that the Red Sox pitcher (a person) showed promise.
You cannot use it because the Red Sox relief pitcher is a person.
These are all correct:
The new Red Sox relief pitcher, nonetheless looks like a promising addition to the team.
Nonetheless, the new Red Sox relief pitcher looks like a promising addition to the team.
The new Red Sox relief pitcher, nevertheless looks like a promising addition to the team.
Nevertheless, the new Red Sox relief pitcher looks like a promising addition to the team.
The new Red Sox relief pitcher, however, looks like a promising addition to the team.
However, the new Red Sox relief pitcher looks like a promising addition to the team.
(Comma instead of full stop after inning’–>, but the new Red Sox relief pitcher looks like a promising addition to the team.

Oops… I forgot that the sentence I’ve mistaken :

The new Red Sox relief pitcher is already a Subject. It’'s impossible to put another Subject (It) into the next sentence. That ‘nonetheless/nevertheless’ tricked me!!! Thanks a million~

-back from a very long absent :slight_smile: