Can "I" substitute "myself"?

Nevertheless, Mercedes-Benz invited AsiaOne to a special media preview of the event, and myself (Ben), my colleague Lynette and our photographer Dennis went along to see what’s what.

Can “I” substitute “myself”?

Thanks.

Yes you can. But I would split it into two sentences, and put ‘I’ or ‘myself’ at the end of the list.

…a special preview of the event. My colleague, photographer and I/myself went along…

Some people claim that you should not use ‘myself’ in this sentence. ‘I’ is the normal subject pronoun.

I went along to see what’s what.

You would NEVER use ‘myself’ in the above sentence.

Myself went along to see what’s what.
This usage was done in the past, but not in modern English. So you will see it in older writings.

You can only use ‘myself’ as the subject when it is part of a list (compound subject).

John and I went along to see what’s what.
(More common way to say it)

John and myself went along to see what’s what.
(Adds emphasis in a compound subject. This should only be used if the intent of the speaker or writer is to emphasize that they went along. If it is a simple statement without emphasis, then it should not be used.)

Reflexive Pronoun
The subject and object are the same. In other words, the person performing the action is that same as the person the action is performed on.

I hurt myself
(I performed the action on myself. So I am both subject and object in the sentence.)

I - always the subject pronoun
Me - always the object pronoun
Myself - can be either the subject or object pronoun, depending on usage.

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It should be: … my colleague Lynette, our photographer Dennis and I went along to see what’s what.

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What exactly do you mean, my dear man?

I don’t know. I merely quoted what the writer said.

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“To find out what’s what” is idiomatic.

It just means to understand something, and to sort things out. It usually means you will see something in person, or go there in person. It can refer to events, things, situations, etc.

Without more context it’s difficult to know the exact meaning in the quote.

Maybe you could rewrite it as:

My colleague Lynette, our photographer Dennis and I went along to see for ourselves.

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