Can "article" be used as a verb?

Hi!

At the above quiz was asked for a verb for the expression: “to bind with a contract” and the suggestion for the correct solution was “article”.

As I often use and compare the grammar of “dict.leo.org” (quite helpful) I did so, too, this time. Although “dict?s grammar” nearly always matches to what here is said I couldn?t find a verb “article”. Have they missed anything?

Michael

Hi Michael

What quiz are you referring to exactly?
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Hi Michael,

The word ‘article’ is used as a verb in a special sense - literally to bind or contract an apprentice by articles (statements made in a document) of apprenticeship. It is often used in the passive form as in an ‘articled clerk’ who is a sort of student solicitor.

Alan

It may be better that I don’t know which quiz Michael was referring to.

hehe :lol: :wink:

Hi Alan!

As far as I get your explanation right “article” as a verb is mainly used in contracts, so is it in the sense of law? Could you give me one or two more examples about it? Just for better comprehension?

Amy, sorry for keeping you waiting! :oops: I meant the word-quiz on the top of the site. I chose “quiz” because the left button links you to the “full quiz”

Best Regards

MIchael

Hi Michael,

Yes, you’re right as it does have legal implications. ‘The articles’ referred to in my first post are the details/conditions of an agreement drawn up between the trainee/apprentice and the company/firm offering the training. It’s like a practical training to become a solicitor whereby the trainee earns a small fee and learns as we say ‘on the job’. It’s an area I know little of and I only know it in that specific sense. Best I can offer, I’m afraid.

Alan

Thank you Alan, it helps a lot.

By the way, after having a certain look at the internet, I additional found the expression “articling clerk”! Whatever that may mean. :roll:

Michael

That might be exactly what an American would say too, Michael. :lol:
I’ve never heard of an “articling clerk” and seriously doubt that an American would be able to figure it out even in the context of the full sentence (unless the sentence were actually the definition, that is).
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Hi

Here is another word that makes me wonder: “ageing”. I came across it in a public campaign about beauty cream on TV. I mean to age in the sense of getting older one can do passively only, like a flower that smells, or am I mistaken here?

Michael

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That’s a commonly used verb, Michael, but I add the -ing ending this way: ‘aging’.

You’re right. The intransitive verb ‘to age’ basically means to grow or become older or more mature. He has really aged since the last time I saw him.

However, you can also say ‘to age someone/something’ (transitive verb). In this case, someone or something causes or makes someone/something else older or seem old. The loss of his two sons on 9/11 seemed to age him 20 years overnight.

The transitive verb ‘to age’ can also mean ‘bring something to maturity’. You can age wine or cheese, for example.
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Hi Amy!

In the public campaign is advised to an “Anti Ageing Cream” like I wrote it. Okay, everyone knows what is spoken about there and honestly “Making Young Cream” would sound incredible and ridiculous.

Might be that “ageing” is written that way intentionally because many German do know the word age but concluding from “anti aging” to a younger looking skin would need a deeper insight into the rules of the English language and likely not lead to success.

Thanks

Michael

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Both spellings are acceptable and in use.
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